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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2010) 25 (1 (73)): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2010
...Ned Schantz This essay considers the recurring problem of plot alternatives in Alfred Hitchcock, of powerful shadow scenes that overwhelm the manifest plot and demand a critical account of their own. Confronting such shadow scenes, the viewer takes up a social position in a long chain of failed...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2013) 28 (2 (83)): 109–149.
Published: 01 September 2013
... popularity of Mary Hartman reveals viewers' frustrations with television in the 1970s and, furthermore, that the show was uniquely able to integrate a nationwide audience, even as executives envisioned it as a series of discrete markets divided by gender and class. The show, which at times verged on the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2014) 29 (2 (86)): 59–83.
Published: 01 September 2014
...Alexia Smit Critical accounts of plastic surgery television tend to explain women viewers' engagement with it either through comparisons to pornography and in terms of visual pleasure or by figuring the viewer as a docile, disciplined subject who reproduces the values espoused by the format. This...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2017) 32 (3 (96)): 1–31.
Published: 01 December 2017
...Tison Pugh Despite the progressive ambitions announced in its title, the sitcom Modern Family (ABC, 2009–) has been excoriated by many viewers for its purported conservatism and reactionary politics. In particular, the program’s treatment of homosexuality, evident in the story line of gay couple...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2009) 24 (3 (72)): 41–71.
Published: 01 December 2009
... realistic illusion of the cinema and disrupt the viewer's identification with the screen—especially the male spectator's—and the construction of his (or her) coherent subjectivity. This “wounding” of the cinematic apparatus leads to the traumatization of viewers, who are forced to confront what they would...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2018) 33 (1 (97)): 83–111.
Published: 01 May 2018
...Niels Niessen Rosetta (dir. Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, France/Belgium, 1999) teases the viewer into a spiritual mind game. At first viewing, the film appears to be about a young woman’s quest for a job. On very close analysis, though, Rosetta turns out to be encrypted with the holy spirit...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2008) 23 (3 (69)): 81–109.
Published: 01 December 2008
... practice in relation to feminist politics, on one hand, and popular culture, on the other? When does self-representation overstep the boundary between sexual valorization and prurient commodification? How, in turn, should a female viewer respond to erotic visual material produced by a woman? In order to...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2008) 23 (3 (69)): 111–135.
Published: 01 December 2008
... mastery for the viewer and theorist. Camera Obscura 2008 Brian Wall is an assistant professor of cinema at Binghamton University, State University of New York. He is currently working on a manuscript exploring Theodor Adorno's conceptions of spirit in relation to cinema. “Jackie Treehorn...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2010) 25 (1 (73)): 161–195.
Published: 01 May 2010
... representations they seek. The facettes de la petite mort featured on Beautiful Agony are drawn from amateur video submissions of the faces of women and men experiencing orgasm, or so the viewer is meant to presume. While the site may be conceptually innovative in the realm of adult Web sites for its lack of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 25 (3 (75)): 29–67.
Published: 01 December 2011
...,” viewers and critics are unaware of the extent to which the film draws on Bollywood's affective economy, generic idioms, and performance traditions. Few would recognize that the heroine Satine's transformation from conniving showgirl to tragic heroine recalls the tawaif (courtesan) figure in popular Hindi...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2010) 25 (2 (74)): 183–195.
Published: 01 September 2010
...” Michelle, and the limits of what it can convey to its audience. Maitra shows how the diffused, “middling” presence of Hima's camera locates Lopez in the middle of her contradictory emotions, and gives viewers a sense of her statelessness, of the unnerving position of being both contained and dispossessed...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 26 (3 (78)): 95–135.
Published: 01 December 2011
... in the present about the “impoverished” tableaus of sexploitation films is the shunted melancholia of obsolescence. Sexploitation maintains a hold on contemporary viewers precisely through the films' constriction by history, by their seeming containment within their own historical moment and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2012) 27 (3 (81)): 69–98.
Published: 01 December 2012
... simultaneously promoting her image of eternal adolescence. Throughout Durbin's career, the standardization of playback as a means of producing Hollywood musical numbers guaranteed that viewers would always be reminded of the time of the music's recording, a moment exposed in her early films in which Durbin was...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2013) 28 (3 (84)): 159–167.
Published: 01 December 2013
... pleasurable investments of certain communities of viewers. Wood's and Doty's “low” archives were their own personal experiences and contingent affective responses. These are the very foundations of queer theory, grounded in what Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick identified as antihomophobic critical practice, that Wood...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2014) 29 (2 (86)): 1–33.
Published: 01 September 2014
... director humiliates her at an audition by demanding the right to inspect her body, she begins disembodied phone sex work. Most critics of the film either emphasize the main character's growth or observe that her interiority remains unavailable to viewers despite the film's extensive use of close-ups...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2015) 30 (3 (90)): 27–59.
Published: 01 December 2015
..., viewers are awakened to the unfortunate history of Japanese colonialism and thus experience a feeling of regret or melancholy for the past. This cinematic encounter with the past also resonates with cultural imagery of Seoul as a forgotten colonial city that has reemerged across Korean society, especially...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 41–69.
Published: 01 May 2015
... more surprising—and more recent—promise of the medium: that TV can in fact keep the viewer alive by helping her lose weight. While the proliferation of reality TV formats and lifestyle programming has marked the increased visibility of corpulent bodies on television, how is it that a medium once...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 71–99.
Published: 01 May 2015
... instrumental to theorizing addictive spectatorship, a concept that takes seriously the notion that television may act affectively as a drug. Recovery television, it claims, helps viewers negotiate their own relationship to television consumption. Furthermore, such a negotiation augments notions of neoliberal...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 155–183.
Published: 01 May 2015
... unpredictable antisocial affective engagement among cast members. These scenes generate a thrilling anxiety that encourages serialized watching and potentially endless interpretation by viewers, creating a ratings economy out of an affective one. Through a reading of The Real Housewives of Atlanta (2008–), this...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2017) 32 (2 (95)): 89–115.
Published: 01 September 2017
... popular media. Particularly significant here is the program's emphasis on female friendship. Yet such “gynocentric” qualities and the series' affinity with young viewers might have been eroded in recent episodes. This is partly through the incorporation of more masculine genres, but also in the increasing...