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vertigo

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2011) 25 (3 (75)): 101–141.
Published: 01 December 2011
...Kriss Ravetto-Biagioli Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo is one of the most acclaimed films of all times, recognized by scores of critics, film theorists, and film historians as a pivotal work in both film history and film theory. By now, Vertigo is so deeply embedded in film theory that it is almost...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1977) 1 (2 (2)): 67–92.
Published: 01 September 1977
... prevents us, to imagine the con- trary, 'Chantal Akerman's Bobby.' Perhaps, this explains the violence of these subdued titles so different from the compressed power of earlier film credits (designed by Saul Bass: Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Birds). These titles delineate one...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 323–327.
Published: 01 December 1989
... between character and social milieu, thereby forcing Polanski to confront the implications of the stereotyped depiction of women and others he had put forward in his more modernist works. Two essays I have published more recently, on Vertigo and Letter from an Unknown Woman, have viewed...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1977) 1 (2 (2)): 147.
Published: 01 September 1977
... to Janey Place, University ofCalifor- nia, Santa Cruz. Photogram from Sbaoui0/a Doubt thanks toJaney Place, University ofCalifornia, SantaCruz and Bill Nichols, Queen's University, Lang- ston, Canada. Frame enlargements from Mamie, The Birds, Vertigo by B. Augst. 92: Frame enlargements...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1979) 1-2 (3-1 (3-4)): 104–132.
Published: 01 May 1979
... somber. There is, of course, The Wrong Man: exactly like Psycho (inscribed between the colorful symphonies of North by Northwest and The Birds), it left a trail of shadow, three years earlier, between The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo. The two films do have in common a kind...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1991) 9 (1-2 (25-26)): 74–100.
Published: 01 September 1991
....’ In- vestigations of cinematic subjectivity and spectatorship regularly return to what are now, as a consequence, the canonical Hitchcock texts, all linked by the spectacle of the blonde: Grace Kelly in Rear Window, Kim Novak in Vertigo, Janet Leigh in Psycho, Tippi Hedren in The Birds and Marnie, and Eva...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2003) 18 (1 (52)): 188–190.
Published: 01 May 2003
... University Press, 2002. Barber, Stephen M., and David L. Clark, eds. Regarding Sedgwick: Essays on Queer Culture and Critical Theory. New York: Routledge, 2002. Barr, Charles. Vertigo. London: British Film Institute, 2002. Bernard, Anne-Marie, ed. The World of Proust: As Seen by Paul Nadar...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1990) 8 (3 (24)): 206–215.
Published: 01 September 1990
... is often unique. It points relentlessly to one of the essential properties of the letter -that elliptical space of loss around which some of the greatest films have constructed their scenarios: Ophuls’s Letter from an Unknown Woman, the ultimate example of a letter driven to vertigo...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2010) 25 (1 (73)): 1–27.
Published: 01 May 2010
... not deliberately murder his first wife in the backstory of Rebecca (US, 1940)? He does in the novel!4 Does Johnnie not try to push Lina out of the car and over the cliff at the end of Suspicion (US, 1941)? Does Scottie not hurl Judy off the tower at the end of Vertigo (US, 1958)?5 To be sure, repressive...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2008) 23 (2 (68)): 1–39.
Published: 01 September 2008
... of decorum. We can imagine Vertigo (dir. Alfred Hitchcock, US, 1958) as the operative reference, with some reconfigurations to its narrative unfolding that aim to avoid, for example, Scottie’s (James Stewart) recogni- tion that Madeleine and Judy (Kim Novak) are the same woman, or to rewrite Judy’s...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2007) 22 (1 (64)): 77–111.
Published: 01 May 2007
... because of the way the hand is assembled out of tone and light without declaring its identity as a hand.”32 This is the vertigo to which Thomas and the spectator fall prey — “the vertigo of the stain,” the dizziness provoked by a figure at the limits of form, a figure sliding away toward the indis...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 235–241.
Published: 01 December 1989
... where Melanie is reduced to hysterical catatonia and Vertigo- when the film shifts to Judy’s look of knowledge, her death follows-and in Rear Window, although Lisa does get the film’s last look at the fashion magazine. Exploring male sexuality ii la Freud, the terrain...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2003) 18 (2 (53)): 1–25.
Published: 01 September 2003
... is not sustained, but rather partial, fragmentary, mixed with other concerns. Nearly every sense is in operation, and the image is the composite of them all. —Kevin Lynch To compose is to arrange unequal things. —John Ruskin Vertigo Too Early, Too Late [Trop tot, trop tard] (dir. Jean-Marie...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1990) 8 (3 (24)): 88–97.
Published: 01 September 1990
...] enunciation.” See Metz, “L‘Ecran second, ou le rectangle au carrk (sur une figure riflexive du film Vertigo 4 (1989): 127-33. 3. Damisch sets out more explicitly the program for this approach to art history-where object and method, and discipline and discipline, blur- in his famous The‘orie du...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1982) 3-4 (2-3-1 (8-9-10)): 74–87.
Published: 01 December 1982
... Hitchcock’s Vertigo which is considered to be a fiction film with no relation to documentary. Ifit is projected in front of you all ofa sudden, pow, at IO:OO in the morning, just as you’re coming 78 in, and you see Kim Novak walking down the street-O.K., a woman walking down the street-first...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1984) 4 (3 (12)): 130–143.
Published: 01 December 1984
...-figures 137 all others, or else a meta-figural principle that launches figuration into a kind of signhing vertigo: “irony is no longer a trope but the undoing of the deconstructive allegory of all tropological cognition , the systematic undoing, in other words, of understanding,” de Man claims...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1992) 10 (3 (30)): 34–49.
Published: 01 May 1992
..., particularly Grace Kelly, Tippi Hedren, and Kim Novak, seem to have been selected with this fantasy in mind. Vertigo is devoted to this patriarchal motif. 12. But Marvin has been expressing his contempt all along as a not-to-be- credited irony; what the film...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2013) 28 (1 (82)): 103–123.
Published: 01 May 2013
... wife. Hitchcock has covered this ground on more than one occa- sion, perhaps most famously in Vertigo (US, 1958). To be sure, the implications of the man-­woman arrangement appear to be rather complicated if not odious, particularly to any kind of feminist proj- ect, as the very essence...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1984) 4 (3 (12)): 66–85.
Published: 01 December 1984
... of Ropars’s book to any classic academic work may be necessary to the deconstructive project of dis- mantling classic critical precepts and procedures: the vertigo of displace- ment that her style can enact works because the reader has entered the text expecting something...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2007) 22 (3 (66)): 1–23.
Published: 01 December 2007
..., 1930) and Dishonored (dir. Josef von Sternberg, US, 1931) and the staging of male voyeurism in the investigative plots of Marnie (dir. Alfred Hitchcock, US, 1964), Rear Window (dir. Alfred Hitchcock, US, 1954), and (in the only sustained reading of the article) Vertigo (dir. Alfred Hitchcock...