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terminator

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2002) 17 (2 (50)): 69–107.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., “Horizons of Violence: Infanticidal Limits of Evolution and Culture.” Sigourney Weaver as Ripley in Alien Resurrection (dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet, US, 1997) Conceptions and Contraceptions of the Future: Terminator 2, The Matrix, and Alien Resurrection A. Samuel Kimball The future can only...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1986) 5 (3 (15)): 66–85.
Published: 01 December 1986
...Constance Penley © 1986 by Camera Obscura 1986 The Terminator (James Cameron, 1984) Time Travel, Primal Scene, and the Critical Dystopia Constance Penle y If the sure sign of postmodern success is the ability to inspire spin-offs, The Terminator was a prodigy. The film was...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2007) 22 (3 (66)): 61–91.
Published: 01 December 2007
... limited to the Terminator (from The Terminator, Terminator 2: Judgment Day, and Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines). RoboCop, from the movie with the same title, also carries a gun, which, while holstered inside his right thigh, fails to be integrated in any way into his arm; the same is true of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1997) 14 (1-2 (40-41)): 161–179.
Published: 01 May 1997
... media entertainment not only as social dilemmas but as social relations. In these productions’ renditions of personal quests for world reclamation, the private and the general work brilliantly to elide the social. The Terminator (1984) illustrates in exemplary fashion the tense relations...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2006) 21 (1 (61)): 59–63.
Published: 01 May 2006
..., inside-outed: inde- termination as the event horizon of the bodily interface with pro- pioceptive biomedia.14 At these limits where we must renounce all claims of mastery, criticism promises as well a politics yet to come.15 It is a criticism that must — and for essential reasons — engage with...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2007) 22 (2 (65)): 134–139.
Published: 01 September 2007
.... Just as the figure of Judy Garland was able to “articulate directly the desire to escape into the world of the movies,” so is Jones able to embody the impos- sible dream of terminal transgression.6 This is why she is so com- pelling, why her icy insouciance is so seductive, and why she still...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1986) 5 (3 (15)): 3–5.
Published: 01 December 1986
... Terminator as the starting point for a discussion of the way recent science fiction film uses various structures of fantasy (the primal scene, family romance, infantile sexual investigation) to en- sure the spectator’s psychical involvement in scenarios of technology and apocalypse, sexuality and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2017) 32 (1 (94)): 179–186.
Published: 01 May 2017
... as the vice president in charge of creative development. This move positioned her as one of the few female production executives working in Hollywood. Rothman’s directorial efforts at Dimension Pictures included the 1973 filmsGroup Marriage (US) and Terminal Island (US), and 1974’s The...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1986) 5 (3 (15)): 6–35.
Published: 01 December 1986
... dead. Gillian is a widow raising her son as a single parent. (She is the first of a number of unat- tached mothers or mothers-to-be in the genre’s contemporary films, in- cluding E. T., Starman, and The Terminator-and indicative of SF’s generic reversal of the structure of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 108–111.
Published: 01 December 1989
... old-fashioned notions in these 109 postmodern days) is produced, and the meanings any particular au- dience member makes. There is, then, also the whole range of problems entailed in attempting to establish whether there are any specific de- terminations which have any systematic bearing on...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 175–178.
Published: 01 December 1989
... class relations: the economic restrictions of “shop girl” wages, the possibilities of love between the classes, the economic de- terminants of prostitution, sexual harassment in the work place, the oppression of working-class life. In different ways, these films all ex...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1982) 3-4 (2-3-1 (8-9-10)): 233–237.
Published: 01 December 1982
... problems from a psychoanalytic perspective: textual con- struction of subjectivity and desire, conditions of spectatorship, de- terminations of sexual difference, etc. Peter Wollen’s paper was both original and illuminating in this respect, having effected a happy and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2012) 27 (3 (81)): 1–37.
Published: 01 December 2012
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1980) 2 (2 (5)): 72–79.
Published: 01 September 1980
... ever. The patient, who according to him had appeared to be an asexual being. . .was now in the throes of an hysterical childbirth (pseudocyesis), the logical termination of a phantom preg- nancy that had been invisibly developing in response to Breuer’s minis- trationThe Jones account (always...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1979) 1-2 (3-1 (3-4)): 211–215.
Published: 01 May 1979
... situations the speaking is unilateral, does not circulate, but falls, terminated once uttered. In the same way do the physical gestures between individuals fall short, time after time. Thus these themes of failed verbal com- munication are linked with the problem of physical...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 190–194.
Published: 01 December 1989
... of attention and strategies of reading are directed and redirected according to a number of de- terminants. As this brief summary indicates, I consider spectatorship to be a construct which marks the intersection of a number of discursive PO- sitions-the implied point of address of the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2007) 22 (2 (65)): 158–165.
Published: 01 September 2007
.... Courtesy of Richard Termine Copyright © 2001 by Camera Obscura Camera Obscura 45, Volume 15, Number 3 Published by Duke University Press 165 ...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2008) 23 (1 (67)): 172–177.
Published: 01 May 2008
... admit that most news coverage and public- ity material on Streep’s personal life holds her up as the embodi- ment of undivaesque marital and family values. For example, she is known — and admired — for putting her career on hold to care for her terminally ill lover, the actor John Cazale. Streep...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1997) 14 (1-2 (40-41)): 129–160.
Published: 01 May 1997
...Sarah L. Higley Copyright © 1996 by Indiana University Press 1997 REFERENCES Bukatman , Scott , Terminal Identity: The Virtual Subject in Postmodern Fiction (Durham: Duke UP, 1983 ). Butler , E. M. , The Myth of the Magus (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1993 ). Camille...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1999) 14 (3 (42)): 96–123.
Published: 01 September 1999
... names the Corps. Bodies and Machines~ Mark Seltzer's provocative study of realist, naturalist, and industrialist writing from the 1850s to the 1920s, de• termines that "nothing typifies the American sense of identity more than the love of nature (nature's nation) except perhaps...