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reality television

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2014) 29 (2 (86)): 59–83.
Published: 01 September 2014
... has published in the area of affect and visceral displays of the body in both television drama and reality television. Her current research focuses on affect in postapartheid South African television. © 2014 by Camera Obscura 2014 Figure 1. Maria shyly tilts her head away from the camera...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 129–153.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Kristen J. Warner This article explores the interstitial spaces between positive and negative representations of black womanhood on reality television. It argues that regardless of the presence of supposedly positive images in media, if audiences choose to see black women as “loud,” the symbolic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 1–9.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Lynne Joyrich; Misha Kavka; Brenda R. Weber This introduction to the special issue “Project Reality TV” interrogates, while also playing with, some of TV's forms and conventions, particularly those of the “preshow special” and the interview format. Borrowing from this format, it explores key issues...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 185–195.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Jane Feuer This essay attempts to break down a binary opposition between “quality TV” and reality TV, which is usually set up along an axis of distinction based on aesthetic value. That is: HBO dramas are art; reality TV shows are trash. As Misha Kavka writes, “Because reality television is seen...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 71–99.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Hunter Hargraves This article charts the emergence of a subgenre of reality television, recovery television, in which individuals with compulsive behaviors or addictions to unhealthy substances are profiled and reformed through a staged intervention. It argues that recovery television...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 41–69.
Published: 01 May 2015
... more surprising—and more recent—promise of the medium: that TV can in fact keep the viewer alive by helping her lose weight. While the proliferation of reality TV formats and lifestyle programming has marked the increased visibility of corpulent bodies on television, how is it that a medium once...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2011) 26 (2 (77)): 65–89.
Published: 01 September 2011
... demonstrates how reality TV contributes to social governance through disciplinary discourse. Although it achieved international success as a global franchise and treated a supposedly universal subject matter, child rearing, it is at first surprising that the program was not localized for the Australian market...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2010) 25 (2 (74)): 183–195.
Published: 01 September 2010
... by the state. Drawing on contemporary television studies that link the genre of courtroom television to neoliberal governance, the article finally suggests that if (reality) television takes legal citizenship of its citizen-subjects for granted, And I Do Survive articulates precisely the gap between...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2018) 33 (1 (97)): 113–137.
Published: 01 May 2018
... spaces and aesthetics for producing collective memory that differently configure spectatorial interaction and social intervention. Counterposing the hyperindustrialized military vision of the fictional reality TV show Drones with the social media–styled memory market TruNode, the film’s caricature...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 101–127.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Misha Kavka Perhaps no reality TV program has been as roundly criticized for bad behavior as Jersey Shore (MTV, 2009–12). The libidinal license exhibited by the cast, as well as the early controversy regarding the show's use of the terms guido and guidette to describe the Italian American cast...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 11–39.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., and figures of the female grotesque not with reality television per se but with an episode of the NBC sitcom 30 Rock (2006 13). In Standards and Practices, limelight-­loving star Jenna Maroney (Jane Krakowski) makes a bid for public support following her stint as the mean judge on a faux reality...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 155–183.
Published: 01 May 2015
... before a cut to another confessional a reality TV convention where cast members speak privately to the camera in which cast mate NeNe Leakes explains, Sheree is jealous of me; I know that for a fact. Cut to a restaurant. The camera pans out for an Camera Obscura 88, Volume 30, Number 1 doi...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (3 (90)): 188–190.
Published: 01 December 2015
... Continuity, Reality Celebrity, and the Female Grotesque. No. 88: pp. 11 – 39 Lynne Joyrich, Misha Kavka, and Brenda R. Weber Project Reality TV: Preshow Special. No. 88: pp. 1 – 9 Kyoung-Lae Kang Kyung-Sung: Cinematic Memories of the Colonial Past in Contemporary Korea. No. 90: pp. 27...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2014) 29 (3 (87)): 184–185.
Published: 01 December 2014
...: The Worlds of Susanne Bier. No. 85: pp. 5 – 31 Belinda Smaill, see Therese Davis and Belinda Smaill Alexia Smit Care, Shame, and Intimacy: Reconsidering the Pleasures of Plastic Surgery Reality Television. No. 86: pp. 59 – 83 Julia Vassilieva “Becoming-Girl”­ in the New Russian Cinema: Youth...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2006) 21 (1 (61)): 47–51.
Published: 01 May 2006
... to be “a trophy wife.” Each 50  •  Camera Obscura woman says she feels confident and empowered by her procedures. There are no negatives in sight, though we do occasionally witness patients vomiting from general anesthesia. Like the majority of reality TV programs, these shows mostly star...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1990) 8 (2 (23)): 4–7.
Published: 01 May 1990
..., game shows, reality television, and prime-time soaps as his examples, Fiske explores how television invites its audiences into the space of representation so that viewers can comment back on and even re-envision that space. Elaborating on the differences between “dominant...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2006) 21 (3 (63)): 137–143.
Published: 01 December 2006
..., “ ‘Take Responsibility for Yourself’: Judge Judy and the Neoliberal Citizen,” in Reality TV: Remaking Television Culture, ed. Susan Murray and Ouellette (New York: New York University Press, 2004), 231 – 50. Lynne Joyrich is associate professor of modern culture and media...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1993) 11 (1 (31)): 96–119.
Published: 01 May 1993
..., demographically targeted shows which have become popularly described as “reality television.” Fox shows such as America’s Most Wanted (AMW), Cops, Code 3, and On Scene: Emergency Response were successful enough to be widely imitated by the other three networks (e.g., FBI...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2010) 25 (1 (73)): 161–195.
Published: 01 May 2010
... industry. The “porn star” is now a bona fide celebrity, showing up in entertainment mag- azines, music videos, ad campaigns, and reality television shows.17 While the mainstreaming of adult industry culture has translated into more profits, there is a downside to this upward mobility...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (2 (89)): 125–155.
Published: 01 September 2015
...-­themed reality television that focuses on all-­white rural families, such as Duck Dynasty (A&E, 2012 – ) and Cajun Justice (A&E, 2012), and even Here Comes Honey Boo Boo (TLC, 2012 – 14). Marjorie Kaplan, the group president of Discovery Channel, TLC, and Animal...