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postwar television

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2019) 34 (3): 31–61.
Published: 01 December 2019
...Josie Torres Barth This article makes a case for formal analysis of historical TV through close readings that demonstrate the ways in which postwar television unsettled the domestic sphere. While scholars of historical television have dismissed formal criticism for its ignorance of contexts of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1988) 6 (1 (16)): 9–46.
Published: 01 January 1988
... home through a set of economic determinations, including manufacturer and network business strategies and the postwar climate of consumption. But these economic determi• nations cannot fully comprehend the process by which television came to be a domestic object and entertainment form. In this...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2011) 26 (2 (77)): 65–89.
Published: 01 September 2011
... institution that grew up alongside the suburban expansion of the postwar era — ­maintains strong ties with concepts of the family.7 Even as the structure of family and its The Politics of Third Way TV  •  69 engagements with media and technologies continue to shift...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 71–99.
Published: 01 May 2015
... on children. Spigel attributes these anxieties to the ambivalence toward technology that Americans have had for the past two cen- turies, although she locates in television specifically a potential threat to the carefully organized temporal and spatial rituals that governed postwar American...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2014) 29 (3 (87)): 33–63.
Published: 01 December 2014
...Matt Delmont This essay examines how housewife and political activist Irene McCabe drew national television news coverage to protests against busing for school desegregation. While thousands of parents across the nation raised their voices against busing, none received the same level of national...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2019) 34 (3): 127–155.
Published: 01 December 2019
..., work, and subjectivities into the field of postwar media industry studies while revealing how this hidden history invites a rereading of media texts from the period. Copyright © 2019 Camera Obscura 2019 women postwar television 1950s archival screen-writing Figure 1. Pay no attention to...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2013) 28 (2 (83)): 109–149.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Erin Lee Mock Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman (syndicated, 1976 – 77) rightly remains a touchstone for television scholars whose work emphasizes genre, gender, and sexuality, and its creator, Norman Lear, is a critical figure to discussions of the television industry in the 1970s. I argue that the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1988) 6 (1 (16)): 4–8.
Published: 01 January 1988
... in the home by looking at the way popular media of the postwar period intro• duced television to the public. Using women's home magazines, adver• tisements, and television sit-corns, she argues that early discourses on television were replete with ambivalence about the way this new form of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1988) 6 (1 (16)): 47–77.
Published: 01 January 1988
... imagery of the postwar period. One movie producer summed up popular assumptions about the differences between Hollywood stars and TV stars: "TV can give them stories about frustrated butchers and homely aunts but we can take an audience into Vesuvius or plunk them headfirst into the China Sea."25...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1988) 6 (1 (16)): 78–116.
Published: 01 January 1988
... agencies with the capital reserves and business infrastructure that enabled them to dominate the television industry in the postwar era. After the war, federal antitrust action against the motion picture studios broke up the "network" system in movies, while the FCC sanctioned...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2002) 17 (3 (51)): 31–69.
Published: 01 December 2002
... to represent distinct versions of the feminine cul- tural sphere in postwar America. In the industry’s struggle for national hegemony, early renderings of femininity on TV impli- cated issues of class, taste, and region. These issues prominently emerge in the personae of Lyons and Francis and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (1 (88)): 41–69.
Published: 01 May 2015
... to watch that evening’s supper cook and one to watch that evening’s TV programming.10 Building on these insights into the conjugation of television, eat- ing, and social reproduction in the historic instance of postwar Keynesianism, this article asks how reality TV has contoured the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1994) 11-12 (3-1 (33-34)): 242–261.
Published: 01 May 1994
.... 6. Jody Berland, “Angels Dancing: Cultural Technologies and the Produc- tion of Space,” Cultural Studies, ed. Lawrence Grossberg, Cary Nelson, and Paula Treichler (New York: Routledge, 1992) 39. 7. Lynn Spigel, Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2000) 15 (1 (43)): 45–93.
Published: 01 May 2000
...Kirsten Marthe Lentz Camera Obscura 2000 Kirsten Marthe Lentz received her Ph.D. from Brown University in May 2000. She is currently working on a book-length project on 1970s television. Lentz's work has also appeared in Cultural Studies (1993) and Madonnarama: Essays on Sex and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2012) 27 (2 (80)): 1–23.
Published: 01 September 2012
... and audience reception. Lynn Spigel, Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Donald Horton and R. Richard Wohl, “Mass Communication and Para- social Interaction: Observations on Intimacy at a Distance...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2011) 25 (3 (75)): 1–27.
Published: 01 December 2011
... communal devastation the miners' defeat brought about. The miners' strike is not the only relevant context for considering the film's ideological focus on Billy, however, and the article considers those neoliberal transformations of the British television and film industries that resulted in an emphasis on...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2017) 32 (2 (95)): 89–115.
Published: 01 September 2017
... between adults and children even in postwar US television.52 Changes in broadcasting under- mined the association of cartoons with children, most prominently with the emergence of television channels such as Nickelodeon, Boomerang, and the Cartoon Network seemingly catering exclu- sively to child...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2013) 28 (3 (84)): 67–101.
Published: 01 December 2013
... Weimar period. Through the placement of the female minor characters, Berlin Alexanderplatz challenges the traditional terms of value often associated with the historical television miniseries. Contra contemporaneous miniseries like Heimat (WDR/SFB, West Germany, 1984), Roots (ABC, 1977), and Days of Hope...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2012) 27 (1 (79)): 1–29.
Published: 01 May 2012
... nale at a rural vacation lodge ended in a spectacular televisual transmission. The lodge became iconic on the tenth day, Camera Obscura Volume Number © by Camera Obscura Published by Duke University Press • Camera Obscura as the NHK public television network simulcast more...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2017) 32 (3 (96)): 93–119.
Published: 01 December 2017
..., and by radical challenges to the social order through the bur- geoning civil rights and feminist movements. As emerging mass media like network television attempted to homogenize Ameri- can regions into a more coherent, unified culture, certain forms of whiteness became identified and devalued...