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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2013) 28 (2 (83)): 109–149.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Erin Lee Mock Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman (syndicated, 1976 – 77) rightly remains a touchstone for television scholars whose work emphasizes genre, gender, and sexuality, and its creator, Norman Lear, is a critical figure to discussions of the television industry in the 1970s. I argue that the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2000) 15 (1 (43)): 45–93.
Published: 01 May 2000
... tarnished image. CBS employed two independent television production companies to accomplish this goal: MTM Enter- prises (headed by Grant Tinker) and Tandem/TAT Productions (headed by Norman Lear and Bud Yorkin). The two companies produced a large number of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2013) 28 (3 (84)): 169–170.
Published: 01 December 2013
... Finding Christa and Off and Running. No. 83: pp. 77 – 107 Bienvenida Matías, see Catherine L. Benamou and Bienvenida Matías Sam McBean Seeing in Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home. No. 84: pp. 103 – 23 Erin Lee Mock “The Soap Opera Is a Hell of an Exciting Form”: Norman Lear’s Mary...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1988) 6 (1 (16)): 128–153.
Published: 01 January 1988
... 139 modern emotional needs - above all the need to renew a sense of selfhood that had grown fragmented, diffuse, and somehow 'unreal.' "17 While the growth of the therapeutic ethos and a consumption-oriented secularism has been linked by T. J. Jackson Lears to a sense of weightlessness found in...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1990) 8 (1 (22)): 50–72.
Published: 01 January 1990
... appeared to wield real economic power, a force to be reckoned with. At the same time and, it seems, for that very reason, the gender connotations of consumption shifted on the symbolic level, in a kind of chiasmus effect. To borrow from Jackson Lears, if nineteenth-century advertising beckoned...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1988) 6 (1 (16)): 47–77.
Published: 01 January 1988
... something outside the individual's everyday experience. Jackson Lears ' At the turn of the century in America, the burgeoning field of mass amuse• ment institutionalized the promise that "real life" was just around the corner. Hollywood, with its...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1990) 8 (2 (23)): 132–147.
Published: 01 May 1990
... ending of King Lear, in which the good prosper and the evil are punished, was more popular than Shakespeare’s be- cause it had a “better moral” (which means one more suited to the social conditions of nineteenth-century America). By the end of the century, however, Shakespeare’s plays had...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2014) 29 (2 (86)): 1–33.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Norman Lear’s 1970s television series, especially The Jeffersons (CBS, 1975 – 85) by way of Good Times (CBS, 1974 – 79). These references occupy the place of conventional character development, pointing to the banal fact of the iterability of defining characteristics that construct the 4...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1990) 8 (2 (23)): 8–41.
Published: 01 May 1990
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1999) 14 (3 (42)): 124–159.
Published: 01 September 1999
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2002) 17 (1 (49)): 73–105.
Published: 01 May 2002
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2002) 17 (1 (49)): 149–187.
Published: 01 May 2002
... for himself as an indi- viduated subject under these conditions, Babe, King Lear–like, wanders off alone, spending a stormy night exposed to the ele- Bringing Up Babe • 169 ments until Hoggett and the dogs find him shivering in the grave- yard in the morning...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2005) 20 (1 (58)): 59–105.
Published: 01 May 2005
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2014) 29 (2 (86)): 85–117.
Published: 01 September 2014
...), East Lynne (1908), Richard III (1908), Oli- ver Twist (1909), and Shakespeare’s Tragedy, King Lear (1909). “Even D. W. Griffith at Biograph could not boast such an output of liter- ary adaptations” (21); indeed, Griffith’s adaptations often took on gigantic proportions, blowing up the source...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2015) 30 (2 (89)): 125–155.
Published: 01 September 2015
... African American audi- ence while still privileging a white one. These limited adjustments made to TV programming in the wake of the civil rights and black power movements created space for the revival of ethnic sitcoms in the 1970s, like Norman Lear’s Sanford and Son (NBC, 1972 – 77) and The...