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indigenous

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2014) 29 (1 (85)): 81–109.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Therese Davis The article looks at the contributions of writer and director Darlene Johnson to an emerging Australian Indigenous cinema. It discusses the ways in which Johnson draws on her experience as a young, urban Indigenous woman and her knowledge of Aboriginal culture to explore the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2016) 31 (3 (93)): 153–163.
Published: 01 December 2016
... engages in collective media production from Inuit women's perspectives with an explicit focus on gender. Arnait's video art, animation, fiction features, television programs, and documentaries address issues faced by women struggling for the recognition of indigenous and minoritarian cultures. The success...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2014) 29 (3 (87)): 184–185.
Published: 01 December 2014
.... 149 – 83 Nick Davis The Face Is a Politics: A Close-Up­ View of Julie Dash’s Illusions. No. 86: pp. 149 – 83 Therese Davis Between Worlds: Indigenous Identity and Difference in the Films of Darlene Johnson. No. 85: pp. 81 – 109 Therese Davis and Belinda Smaill...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 25 (3 (75)): 143–177.
Published: 01 December 2011
... for governing beleaguered social subjects (the subaltern, the indigenous native, the child, the animal, the refugee) and as an idiom that illustrates the limits of contemporary speculative models of politics. Rangan's work has been published in the SARAI Reader (2007) and South Asian Popular...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2009) 24 (3 (72)): 111–151.
Published: 01 December 2009
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1992) 10 (1 (28)): 262–289.
Published: 01 January 1992
... spatial and temporal dimensions distinct from the present time of the anthropologist. He explains that anthro- pology is premised upon naturalized and evolutionary time; moreover, 265 anthropology has an inherent visualist bias, categorizing indigenous peoples by way of taxonomic tableaus...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 40–52.
Published: 01 December 1989
... shown are indigenous, and the French context in which nearly half of the films are French pr~duced.~It comes as no surprise then that in the English-Canadian context feminists have primarily attended to indigenous works produced by women. While on one level this may look like national...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2016) 31 (2 (92)): 187–193.
Published: 01 September 2016
... POP accumulation in the north and its effects on indigenous people and culture, see Bruce E. Johansen, “The Inuit’s Struggle with Dioxins and Other Organic Pollutants,” American Indian Quarterly 26, no. 3 (2002): 479 – 90. For a more extended exploration, see Marla Cone, Silent...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2005) 20 (1 (58)): 185–207.
Published: 01 May 2005
...). Act of War presents an indigenous perspective on the historical Darkness and Light: Dusky Maidens and Velvet Dreams • 187 events that led up to the overthrow of Hawaii’s sovereign monarch Queen Lili’uokalani and the eventual incorporation of Hawaii into the United States...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2013) 28 (1 (82)): 135–145.
Published: 01 May 2013
..., cinematic memory, transnational media, and diasporic spectatorship. She has worked as an associate producer on documentary film projects and as curator and consultant on the preservation and exhibition of indigenous and Latinoamerican media in New York City and Los Angeles. Bienvenida (Beni) Matías...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2000) 15 (2 (44)): 41–73.
Published: 01 September 2000
... at once mythical and tangible destination, allow the local subject to speak for himself or herself? Does he, as the putative nodal point of the film’s mise-en-scène, demonstrate a sense for indigenous subject positions? How does Baumann’s realist...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1996) 13 (1 (37)): 155–186.
Published: 01 January 1996
... rationality of the state." But-and this is paramount-such "modular" conceptions of individual rights, the bourgeois family, and modern subjecthood were all re-written and re-articulated to fit indigenous ideological and cultural predilections." Consequently, in order to understand the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2003) 18 (2 (53)): 93–123.
Published: 01 September 2003
... country’s colonial past; and (b) the indigenization of the white population of New Zealand. Neill traces how each of these ges- tures is performed in Campion’s film, focusing in particular on 96 • Camera Obscura the director’s conflation of patriarchal with colonial oppression. In Neill’s reading, it...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2003) 18 (1 (52)): 129–155.
Published: 01 May 2003
... biting the record three times while laughing at the camera. This conceit of the indigenous person who does not understand Western tech- nology allows for voyeuristic pleasure and reassures the viewer of the contrast between the Primitive and the Modern: it ingrains the notion that the people are not...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2008) 23 (1 (67)): 184–193.
Published: 01 May 2008
... meanings of the event resonate even more by dint of what I learned later from Georgina: the women who performed the karanga were Hawaiian and transgendered. Familiar with Ma¯ ori protocols of welcome (the indigenous cultures of both places share many linguistic and his- torical similarities...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1984) 4 (3 (12)): 40–65.
Published: 01 December 1984
... discourses on Australian identity, by displacing one of them; natio nal/ intematio nal becomes multinational/ international. 0t h er avail- able oppositions would be local/universal(which can, as I have suggested, structure a redemptive discourse on Australian particularity), or indigenous/ foreign...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2016) 31 (3 (93)): 5–33.
Published: 01 December 2016
... soap operas, as seen in Ceci est un message de l’ideologie dominante (This Is a Message from the Dominant Ideology, Groupe Intervention Vidéo, Canada, 1975); the occupation of Canada’s Department of Indian Affairs (now known as Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada) by Aboriginal women, which...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2016) 31 (1 (91)): 153–163.
Published: 01 May 2016
... documentary that Yates and Kinoy worked on, When the Mountains Tremble (dir. Newton Thomas Sigel and Pamela Yates, US, 1983). The original film was notable for covering the Guate- malan genocide by interviewing corrupt government officials as well as indigenous rebel armies. Traveling with the leftist...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2016) 31 (1 (91)): 187–201.
Published: 01 May 2016
... existing photographs and created archives not of presumably already sub- jugated indigenous people but of the encounters through which they were constituted as such. In these two books, Meiselas offers visual reconstructions of imperialism’s history as a way of making this history critically...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1988) 6 (1 (16)): 191–202.
Published: 01 January 1988
... impositions of culture forced on them from elsewhere, but it ends up questioning why, among other things, quota systems and such-like lead to indigenous productions of the very kinds of cultural products that the quotas were designed to forestall in the first place. Doesn't this recall Georg Lukacs, who...