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impersonate

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2008) 23 (1 (67)): 11–45.
Published: 01 May 2008
... an “unperforming of the self” through the cultivation of an impersonal intimacy that deferred a fixed subjectivity and frustrated the racial expectations of her audiences. She developed this impersona through three interlocking tactics: a disarticulation of self and song; a reversal of the psychic positions...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1990) 8 (2 (23)): 176–205.
Published: 01 May 1990
... of his image. Impersonators at the EPIIA 178 With the aid of these savvy business minds, Elvis, like Jumbo, has become a semiotic system of preservation. Indeed, much as Donna Haraway has argued about the goals of taxidermy in general., pres- ervation aims to arrest...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2009) 24 (3 (72)): 1–39.
Published: 01 December 2009
... of pantomime that had Reconstructing Shirley  • 7 been a hallmark of the silent era — including child impersonation —  began to seem increasingly obsolete. As with the racial masquerade of blackface, the popular practice of adult stars impersonating chil- dren...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2001) 16 (3 (48)): 197–227.
Published: 01 December 2001
..., her screen persona grew even younger, until she was, for all intents and purposes, a child impersonator. In 1914, an industry trade magazine, The Bioscope, pub- lished a review of the Pickford box office hit, Tess of the Storm Coun- Mary Pickford, Masquerade, and the Pedophilic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1976) 1 (1 (1)): 53–70.
Published: 01 May 1976
... fixture will be read, at least at first sight, as "out of place" in a dance.) The repetition of common movements gave the dance an impersonal, object-like aspect, 55 as did the avoidance of eye contact between dancer and audience, or the painted-out face. The interchangeability of objects...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2008) 23 (1 (67)): 69–87.
Published: 01 May 2008
... and its driver, and been denied service at a diner for being a “hippie” — she seeks refuge in a drag club. There she is welcomed and showered with affection by female impersonators playing Bette Davis, Diana Ross, Barbra Strei­ Devouring the Diva  •  77...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1990) 8 (3 (24)): 64–87.
Published: 01 September 1990
...-in the sense of non-mental-status of the sensible image of the table, the table from a particular perspective in space and time, for it can exist apart from the mind-indeed, never need have existed in a mind. It achieves a kind of objectivity in the form of a neutral and impersonal...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1983) 4 (2 (11)): 120–131.
Published: 01 September 1983
... cultural forms, e.g., the somewhat indiscriminate addition of Ancient Greek, Roman, or other classic forms and styles in post-war home architectural design, muzak, Las Vegas-style female impersonation, and the mass commodification of trinkets, figurines, and paintings whose primary function...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2005) 20 (3 (60)): 159–191.
Published: 01 December 2005
... a transitive impersonation of what she essentially is. The extravagance of the art deco idiom thus did The Art of Screen Passing  •  173 not simply signal Orientalism at its extreme; it also created a hypo- thetical site where Wong could play the Orientalist game...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1976) 1 (1 (1)): 71–75.
Published: 01 May 1976
.... The subject- ive, obsessive eye of the camera combined with the dry impersonal tone ofthe narrationcreatesa constant flux oftension, absurdity, intense drama, and pathos. This, Rainer's second feature-length film, reveals a growing virtuosity in the use of parataxic* techniques to control...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1988) 6 (2 (17)): 30–67.
Published: 01 May 1988
..., impersonating [my emphasis] simultaneously object and subject. Also in the masochistic attitude toward life there is generally no object discernible that imposes the suffering and is independent of the ego. It is certainly extant in phantasy, but it does not appear in reality...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2001) 15 (3 (45)): 1–33.
Published: 01 December 2001
..., Wilson performed a double sex transformation by posing as a man impersonating a woman. Wil- son wrote in the accompanying text: “Form determines feeling, so that if I pose in a role I can experience a foreign emotion.” This laconic statement is unclear...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1990) 8 (2 (23)): 42–69.
Published: 01 May 1990
... of the female body as a sexed and sensuous object. She is a low-other7 dragged up from the working-class saloon, who succeeds not through impersonation but- to the degree that she reveals herself to be what she is. If to Olive Logan burlesque performers were a nude army erupting from the show...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2009) 24 (1 (70)): 1–5.
Published: 01 May 2009
... to the negatives that make up photography’s evi- dentiary archives, from the shaded imitations and impersonations of theatrical performativity to the shadows of cinematic illusion- ism, from TV in “black and white” and then in “living color” to digital dreams of recombination and even genetic recoding: our...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1990) 8 (2 (23)): 4–7.
Published: 01 May 1990
... fiction universes, the fans express their concerns about con- temporary problems and their hopes for a better future. Lynn Spigel’s “Communicating With the Dead: Elvis as Medium” investigates this sense of history arnong fans who participate in musical revivals staged by Elvis impersonators...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2007) 22 (2 (65)): 134–139.
Published: 01 September 2007
... bodyguard Atila Altaunbay, and most re­­ cently, with Viscount Ivor Mervyn Vigors Guest; her rumored sado­ masochistic tryst with the fashion designer Kenzo; her Helmut New­ ton and Robert Mapplethorpe photo shoots; her Marlene Dietrich impersonations; her 1989 drug bust; her 1992 bankruptcy; and her...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2004) 19 (1 (55)): 77–111.
Published: 01 May 2004
..., it is not until the de- nouement that we are permitted to experience the pure vaudevil- lian attraction during Handell Fane’s female impersonation tra- peze act, and even then it only serves to remind us that visual pleasure beyond the gaze is no longer an option in Hitchcock’s anxious narratives...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2007) 22 (2 (65)): 127–133.
Published: 01 September 2007
... romance straight out of Freud: the child fantasizing that the parents who raised her are impostors (impersonators?) and that her real parents — who are, of course, far grander in every way than her sham parents — will someday come to claim her. Here’s the catch: I was adopted. Thus, however remote...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2022) 37 (1 (109)): 61–89.
Published: 01 May 2022
..., and unrealized dimensions. 24 For Leo Bersani, the blurred distinctions between individuals during cruising promotes a sense of impersonal connectedness he calls an “ecological ethics” that tempers our sense of self-possession into “an impersonal rhythm.” 29 Quoting Georg Simmel, for Bersani...
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Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2011) 26 (2 (77)): 1–31.
Published: 01 September 2011
... is “worn by a lady, and my favorite lady from Hollywood is Mae West.” With this declaration, Jason puts on the hat, rises, and begins to impersonate, to act out, scenes from West films. What follows is a pure camp spectacle. Jason tightens his mouth and saunters around the room. His performance...