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gender parity

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2018) 33 (3 (99)): 1–19.
Published: 01 December 2018
... women’s cinema at present, visible in the rise of the Berlin School, the development of women-oriented production collectives, and the resurgence of feminist organizing on behalf of gender parity in the contemporary German film industry. Copyright © 2018 Camera Obscura 2018 This content is made freely...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2018) 33 (3 (99)): 129–145.
Published: 01 December 2018
...Hester Baer; Angelica Fenner In this conversation, which took place in Berlin, Ger­many, in August 2017, filmmaker Tatjana Turankskyj discusses recent developments in Pro Quote Film, the feminist initiative she cofounded with several other women filmmakers to promote gender parity in German film...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2018) 33 (3 (99)): 147–155.
Published: 01 December 2018
... film authorship, namely: feminist structures (WIFTG), demands for a quota system (PQF), and a grassroots feminist mentoring collective of film school graduates (ITW). Copyright © 2018 Camera Obscura 2018 gender parity German film industry quota system film collectives Verband der...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1991) 9 (3 (27)): 166–173.
Published: 01 September 1991
...Amanda Howell Copyright © 1992 by The Johns Hopkins University Press 1991 Susan Jeffords’s The Remasculinization of America: Gender and the Vietnam War (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1989) Amanda Howell We must ask more often how things...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 151–154.
Published: 01 December 1989
... Technologies of Gender (1987), theories of female spectatorship, like work on female subjectivity, need to heed the variety and differences that exist among women, to recognize that there is no universal “fe- male.” I was surprised by the third question-has the notion of the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1999) 14 (3 (42)): 50–69.
Published: 01 September 1999
...• struction of national and cultural citizenship, as well as to examine the gender, race, and class dimensions of the national narratives pro• duced by a contemporary Hollywood film explicitly addressed to an audience of adolescent and pre-adolescent US girls. The impetus for my inquiry into Clueless...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2001) 15 (3 (45)): 71–113.
Published: 01 December 2001
... was to align the “cure” for political problems with normative gender and sexual behavior. Pressure Point’s narrative dramatizes this effort to cure, but it also reveals the ideological tensions embed- ded in such a project. In the process of converting...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2012) 27 (3 (81)): 1–37.
Published: 01 December 2012
..., predictable genre by undermining the standard structures of episodic narration and tying its plot to contemporary controversies and politics.1 Tapping into a number of broad social changes, the program admirably portrayed a version of gender parity, included a multiracial cast, depicted love and sex...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2000) 15 (2 (44)): 1–39.
Published: 01 September 2000
... relationship comedies, share anxieties about sex and gender that set them apart from most earlier comedies. Doris Dörrie’s Männer [Men] (1985), a hit from the 1980s, is often cited as a precursor to the Comedy Wave. And the films do evidence certain similarities...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1993) 11 (2 (32)): 102–123.
Published: 01 September 1993
... popular culture. Popular culture is not inherently good or bad in the show-it can be both-but it is connected to women’s daily lives and ways of being, and often it provides a way to critique race and gender stereotypes, an argument to which I will return. This connection is...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1988) 6 (1 (16)): 154–168.
Published: 01 January 1988
... characters were ap• proaching numerical parity with males (of 143 new characters in prime time that fall, 67 were women) and that 76% of adult females on television held jobs outside the horne." John J. O'Connor in his New York Times "TV View" column found that "women are getting more sympathetic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1999) 14 (3 (42)): 70–95.
Published: 01 September 1999
... frontier, particularly since the flexible parameters of screen identity provide an anonymity that offers room for gender play. Feminist critics, however, observe that real-life women in such cyberspace forums as Usenet groups, email lists, Internet Relay Chat lines (IRC), and multi-user domains...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1995) 12 (3 (36)): 49–65.
Published: 01 September 1995
...- sentations such as the ones I’ve described function as a vehicle for the 50 ideological legitimation of views of race, class, and gender in social and cultural life, and to quote George Lipsitz, are “charged with some responsibility for making new social relations credible and legitimate...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2005) 20 (3 (60)): 15–55.
Published: 01 December 2005
... Community in Interwar Japan This article focuses on the Japanese “woman’s film” (   josei eiga) and considers how national and modern gender identities converged in Japan’s interwar period. Japanese cinema in this era coincided with a prevalence of cultural discourses on modernity: what it...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2004) 19 (1 (55)): 43–75.
Published: 01 May 2004
... moral panic around lone motherhood.8 By considering the gender politics as they are rendered through the mollifying nos- talgic gloss of the heritage film, we can see that what appears to be a utopian construction of Howards End actually functions as what Michel Foucault calls a “heterotopia”—a...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1995) 12 (2 (35)): 6–23.
Published: 01 May 1995
... the o.g. negotiates the disjuncture between his transient economic authority and his more permanent social parity. Is this discrepancy a rationale for his brooding or his anger? More importantly, however, G is presented as a post-industrial o.g., an original gangsta forced to spend more time...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1992) 10 (2 (29)): 57–90.
Published: 01 May 1992
... hege- monic scientific inscription of the female body and a critical feminist voicing of women’s agency. Precisely because of its gendered character and public invisibility, endometriosis illuminates the coexistence of an up-to-date endoscopic panopticon (laparoscopy, laser laparoscopy...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2001) 16 (3 (48)): 83–111.
Published: 01 December 2001
... design, but has escaped scholarly attention in the Film Studies field. Thus I will examine the way that Art Deco reflects a certain gender politics (not only in the cinema, but in the movement’s production of sculpture, lamps, jewelry, and objets d’art). I will explore how Garbo’s iconic persona is...