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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2015) 30 (3 (90)): 27–59.
Published: 01 December 2015
....” © 2015 by Camera Obscura 2015 Korean modernity colonial memory urban memory noir space forgotten future Figure 1. CGI reconstruction of Kyung-­Sung in the 1930s in Modern Boy (dir. Ji-­woo Jeong, South Korea, 2008) Kyung-Sung:­ Cinematic Memories of the Colonial Past in...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2005) 20 (2 (59)): 119–163.
Published: 01 September 2005
... Galliera and in Kahn’s secreening room. Courtesy Les Documents Cinématographiques, Paris “These Spectacles Are Never Forgotten”: Memory and Reception in Colette’s Film Criticism Paula Amad It is the image in the mind that binds us to our lost treasures, but it is the loss that...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2006) 21 (2 (62)): 74–107.
Published: 01 September 2006
...Jonathan Kahana Camera Obscura 2006 Jonathan Kahana teaches in the Department of Cinema Studies at New York University. He is completing a book on the public spheres of American documentary. William Powell as the Forgotten Man in My Man Godfrey (dir. Gregory La Cava, US, 1936...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2007) 22 (3 (66)): 185–191.
Published: 01 December 2007
... “petrify- ing” feminist studies but “presentifying” it (to echo Vivian Sob- chack’s essay in this series).10 That is, this archive brings perhaps forgotten works and films into the present to act on the future. Works crucial to queer, gay/lesbian, and race (ethnicity, indi- geneity...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2012) 27 (3 (81)): 1–37.
Published: 01 December 2012
... rationalizes the sacrifice of the nonheterosexual, nonreproductive, and nonconformist to build a “better” race. The idealization of biraciality in Battlestar puts eugenic means to modern ends: the biological construction of a future wherein difference can be dealt with in reproductive rather than political...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2016) 31 (3 (93)): 177–183.
Published: 01 December 2016
... experiences in her art practice and building on the tradition of artists who play with the construction of identity. Radha May's work explores forgotten and hidden histories, peripheral sites, and feminine myths. The interview explores her latest project, When the Towel Drops, Volume 1, Italy (2015), which...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2011) 26 (2 (77)): 33–63.
Published: 01 September 2011
... Irigaray's argument that Heidegger has “forgotten” the pre-Socratic element air in a philosophy that privileges materiality and vision, I examine popular films that feature air, and in particular breathing, as a central trope. Because of an emphasis on the more obviously material aspects of visual images...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 26 (3 (78)): 95–135.
Published: 01 December 2011
... that Biller's relay of her own spectatorship of the sexploitation cinema represents a way of imagining female spectatorship as a form of cinephile wandering through the historical frame — and through a cathexis on the world of forgotten bodies and discarded objects, both material and cinematic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2011) 26 (1 (76)): 39–63.
Published: 01 May 2011
... contrary to cinematic suture, has severed them from the original films could also expose the layers of a potential, forgotten relationality. Indeed, they appear like “promissory notes for future elaboration or enigmatic prompts for future scenarios,” implicitly mobilizing the suspended...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2013) 28 (1 (82)): 69–101.
Published: 01 May 2013
... both a past and a future imbued with fantasies of love and being loved in return. Mimi Thi Nguyen is an associate professor of gender and women's studies and Asian American studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her first book is The Gift of Freedom: War, Debt, and Other...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2006) 21 (3 (63)): 153–156.
Published: 01 December 2006
... would take the assignment of forming an archive literally and preserve for the future all of the celluloid and videotape with which women filmmakers have worked outside of the film industry. The completed films would surely be included, but the fragments never used in finished works due to...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2007) 22 (3 (66)): 179–184.
Published: 01 December 2007
....” ARCHIVE FOR THE FUTURE The Imaginary Archive: Current Practice Tess L. Takahashi The term archive usually connotes an officially sanctioned reposi- tory of objects and documents that reinforce a group or nation’s identity and origins. What then can be made of the deluge of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2012) 27 (3 (81)): 169–179.
Published: 01 December 2012
... in documentary and experimental film, film history, the history of film technology, and forgotten or overlooked (film) histories, such as amateur films. She has started a research group and is currently working on an edited book project about forgotten and disappeared film histories in Canada, titled...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2007) 22 (3 (66)): 129–167.
Published: 01 December 2007
... nostalgic formations. While Svetlana Boym, in her impressive study The Future of Nostalgia, has almost single-handedly attempted to resuscitate nostalgia as a potentially productive and, at any rate, indispens- able concept, most references to nostalgia in contemporary critical writing...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1986) 5 (3 (15)): 66–85.
Published: 01 December 1986
... represent no more than American science fiction’s continuing affinity for the dystopian rather than the utopian, with fantasies of cyclical regression or totalitarian empires of the future. Our love affair with apocalypse and Armageddon, accord- ing to Jameson, results from the atrophy of utopian...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2005) 20 (1 (58)): 1–31.
Published: 01 May 2005
...” multiscreen projection: it is a hybrid form, adapting available equipment—cameras and projectors intended primarily for creat- ing single-screen works—for purposes other than those for which it was designed, facing past and future in a moment of technologi- cal transition between old media and new...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1977) 1 (2 (2)): 137–145.
Published: 01 September 1977
... Boston University Library. These materials-the visual style of the clippings and posters, the point-of-view in the articles and correspondence, the reality of all these details-preserve for future generations the Thirties, Forties and Fifties from the inside of a woman artist's life. Recognition...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2014) 29 (2 (86)): 119–147.
Published: 01 September 2014
... “reproductive futurism,” or Judith Halberstam, who lauds the fact that some queers “use space and time in ways that challenge conventional logics of development, maturity, adulthood, and responsibility.”17 These theorists are doubtless aware that resis- tance to conventional marriage and domesticity has...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2007) 22 (1 (64)): 1–41.
Published: 01 May 2007
... powerful mode of expression to highlight the limits of cinematic representation, but at the same time, she generates a similarly urgent conjunction between past, present, and future. In order to understand how she accomplishes this, however, a greater comprehension of the workings of allegory will...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2007) 22 (1 (64)): 77–111.
Published: 01 May 2007
... of time that radically defy any clear-cut distinction among past, present, and future, offering us a temporality that cannot be calculated or determined with certainty, but can only be made visible. Inhabit- ing this temporality, dispersed through its multiple dimensions, is a subject whose...