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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2014) 29 (2 (86)): 85–117.
Published: 01 September 2014
... slapstick comedienne performers — most of whom have now dropped out of historical visibility entirely. I frame this comparative analysis through close readings of two key texts: a Vitagraph trick film, Princess Nicotine; or, The Smoke Fairy (dir. J. Stuart Blackton, 1909), which depicts the surrealistic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2014) 29 (3 (87)): 93–115.
Published: 01 December 2014
... action in these films appears to develop in a political vacuum, the trilogy reads like a fairy tale and, more specifically, like a rereading of “Little Red Riding Hood” from a feminist perspective. At the same time, however, hints that La Ciénaga is set in the late 1970s, La niña santa in the 1980s, and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2017) 32 (2 (95)): 185–192.
Published: 01 September 2017
... of accepting loss in contrast to the search for a fairy-tale ending. Claudia Lo is a master's student at the Comparative Media Studies Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She received her BA in gender and digital culture at Swarthmore College. Her work centers on queer...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1979) 1-2 (3-1 (3-4)): 231–232.
Published: 01 May 1979
... Winham) (1978,80 min., Color, 16 mm) The film takes the fairy tale “Rapunzel” in its best known version by the Grimm Brothers and re-tells it over and over again, using a combination of live-action narrative and animation. There is no documentary foot- age. The animation is used to make the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2001) 16 (3 (48)): 113–157.
Published: 01 December 2001
.... “Colleen Moore’s Fairy Castle,” as it is now called, traveled throughout the United States and Canada in the 1930s to raise Copyright © 2001 by Camera Obscura Camera Obscura 48, Volume 16, Number 3 Published by Duke University Press 113 114 • Camera Obscura money for children’s charities and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1992) 10 (1 (28)): 292–293.
Published: 01 January 1992
... and the Family Ideal in Postwar America by Lynn Spigel. University of Chicago Press, 1992. Forbidden Journeys: Fairy Tales and Fantasies by Victorian Women Writers edited by Nina Auerbach and U. C. Knoepflmacher. University of Chicago Press, 1992. $27.50. Reflexivity in Film and Literature...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1979) 1-2 (3-1 (3-4)): 227–231.
Published: 01 May 1979
..., edited by Elizabeth Cowie. Rapunzel (Asa Sjostrom, Susan Shapiro, Esther Ronay, Francine Winham) (1978,80 min., Color, 16 mm) The film takes the fairy tale “Rapunzel” in its best known version by the Grimm Brothers and re-tells it over and over again, using a combination of live-action...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2008) 23 (1 (67)): 165–171.
Published: 01 May 2008
... D’Acosta, Mick Jagger, David Bowie, David Johansen, Joan Jett, Andy Warhol, and their fictional alter egos: Dorian Gray, Stephen Gordon, Jonathan Brockett, Orlando, Robin Vote, Paul Arbian, Brian Fairy, and Maxwell Demon. From fin de siècle decadence to urban post-punk glam, the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2003) 18 (1 (52)): 188–190.
Published: 01 May 2003
... Global Era. New York: Routledge, 2002. Zipes, Jack. Breaking the Magic Spell: Radical Theories of Folk and Fairy Tales. Rev. and exp. ed. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2002. Zˇizˇek, Slavoj. For They Know Not What They Do: Enjoyment As a Political Factor. London...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1990) 8 (1 (22)): 50–72.
Published: 01 January 1990
... suspense.28 For the first two thirds, The “Teddy” Bears consists of an adaptation 59 of Goldi1ock.s and the Three Bears, in the tradition of the fairy tale genre developed by MCliks, G.A. Smith and Porter himself, notably withJack and the Beanstalk (1902).Unlike the latter film, The “Teddy...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 26 (3 (78)): 137–145.
Published: 01 December 2011
... elevates his films above the others. Camille, Carmen, Pygmalion — all great classic stories about fascinating women. This surely adds to the feel- ing that his women are protagonists, even heroines, and not merely sex objects. So many of my own fantasies also come from literature and from fairy...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2014) 29 (3 (87)): 65–91.
Published: 01 December 2014
....>Michelangelo’s David, it all is too much for her. The forest becomes a strange, animated Children of Men (2006) place, as if it were borrowed from one of the Grimm brothers’ fairy tales. Other fairy tale – like moments in the film include Eva <fig. 5 cap.>Pablo Picasso’s Guernica, falling...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2004) 19 (3 (57)): 157–185.
Published: 01 December 2004
... Rhys-Meyers’s) inspira- tion by Jack Fairy (Micko Westmoreland) and affair with Curt Wild (Ewan McGregor) analogues for David Bowie, Bryan Ferry, and Iggy Pop. But careful observers noted that each figure might also condense and displace various historical figures: Mick Jagger or Brian Eno, for...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2008) 23 (2 (68)): 1–39.
Published: 01 September 2008
.... The two know little about one another, and their momentary spark does not explain or disclose their true connection. The text ends soon after staging this coincidental encounter, and therefore its open-ended structure partly allows for an expansive fairy tale – like fantasy in which...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1988) 6 (2 (17)): 133–154.
Published: 01 May 1988
... to play Pinocchio in Shelley Duval’s Fairy Tale Theater. The mutant toys, Jambi’s head in the genie box and the hands he receives in the mail in the original Pee-wee Herman Show, Pee-wee’s headless torso when Jambi has been only partially successful in bringing him back from...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2015) 30 (3 (90)): 161–187.
Published: 01 December 2015
..., against any understanding of the form- less as the destruction of the symbolic tout court. Indeed, Sombre’s own contingent configuration of theinforme couples a regressive drive toward the undifferentiated with the most formulaic of nar- rative forms — the fairy tale — which functions as a...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1991) 9 (1-2 (25-26)): 224–249.
Published: 01 September 1991
... musical into fairy tale, show, and folk genres leads to inadequate appreciation and accommodation of the MacDonald-Eddy cycle. Viewing all their pictures as belonging to the fairy-tale subgenre (while conceding that some are inflected toward the show and folk categories), Altman partakes of the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2007) 22 (2 (65)): 11–37.
Published: 01 September 2007
... certain fantasy is being played out here: that of Mulvey being my fairy godmother, of her being the one who is apt or inapt to bring me to a certain form of existence, to enable or disenable my desire, my very ability to live as myself, to survive in the only significant sense of the word. This is...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2013) 28 (1 (82)): 69–101.
Published: 01 May 2013
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1991) 9 (3 (27)): 134–147.
Published: 01 September 1991
... normative strictures. However, this fantasy is explicitly contextualized as fantasy: the text panel associated with it has a fairy story, “and they lived happily ever after”-type, ending. The first person fictional narratives of Corpus contrast with the “true stories” of the section called...