1-20 of 135 Search Results for

enunciation

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1979) 1-2 (3-1 (3-4)): 32–69.
Published: 01 May 1979
... and the Look: Feminism and the Enunciative Apparatus in Cinema.” Ciné-Tracts , Vol. 2 , 3-1 (fall, 1978 ). Sigmund , Freud . Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego . New York: W. W. Norton, 1922 . Sigmund , Freud Three Case Histories. New York: Collier Books, 1963...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1982) 3-4 (2-3-1 (8-9-10)): 20–31.
Published: 01 December 1982
...Janet Bergstrom Copyright © 1982 by Camera Obscura 1982 Violence and Enunciation Janet Bergstrorn I was struck by the violence of the film, Sauve quipeut (la vie), how it repeatedly stages the impossibility of living sexual difference as any- thing but an absolute dichotomy...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1981) 3 (1 (7)): 88–109.
Published: 01 May 1981
...Lea Jacobs © 1981 by Camera Obscura 1981 Now Voyager: Some Problems of Enunciation and Sexual Difference Lea Jacobs The representation of sexual difference in the Hollywood cinema has been described as a double movement in which woman functions as a term of difference that...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1977) 1 (2 (2)): 67–92.
Published: 01 September 1977
...Raymond Bellour; Bertrand Augst; Hilary Radner © 1977 by Camera Obscura 1977 Hitchcock, The Enunciator Raymond Bel/our o. The credits have barely starred; a body is seized. Twice a name is claimed: the film's title by its director, and a woman's name by a man. Admittedly...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2011) 26 (1 (76)): 39–63.
Published: 01 May 2011
... defies, I maintain that the archives of the digital age can help us imagine an unruly, incoherent legacy, one in which the women of modernist cinema tear to pieces the enunciation that had initially decided their destiny (Bonvicini) and in which the gleaner's camera reconfigures the path marking the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1977) 1 (2 (2)): 93–104.
Published: 01 September 1977
... instant that the film-strip begins to file past the projector's gate, someone intervenes in the filmic operation in order to inscribe in it the position of an enunciator. The merit of Kuntzel's article is to combine a precise and detailed anal- ysis of a film-text, 'a view in close-up and the broad...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1980) 2 (2 (5)): 116–118.
Published: 01 September 1980
.... Bellour, Raymond Hitchcock, the Enunciator. Vol. I, no. 2; pp. 66-91. Psychosis, Neurosis, Perversion. Vol. I, no. 3-4;pp. 105-132. Alternation, Enunciation, Hypnosis: Interview with Raymond Bellour by Janet Bergstrom. Vol. I, no. 3-4;pp. 71-103...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 155–160.
Published: 01 December 1989
... semiotics and literary critical tools to provide feminist readings of films. But once the concept of enunciation became central to my re- search, the notion of spectatorship became the very pivot of the the- oretical model; in fact, I see this as reflective of the general movement...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1993) 11 (1 (31)): 71–95.
Published: 01 May 1993
... this intervention is that it forged a link between the material conditions of the cinema and the specific way films enun- 75 ciated their messages, thereby reformulating materialism as a perspec- tive grounded in the broadly textual articulation of cultural experience. Because enunciation, due...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1982) 3-4 (2-3-1 (8-9-10)): 242–243.
Published: 01 December 1982
... 3 1-160. Godard: Images, Sounds, Politics. Vol. 3, no. 8-9-10; pp. 211-215. Rellour, Raymond “I Am an Image.” Vol. 3, no. 8-9-10; pp. 117-122. Bergstrom, Janet Violence and Enunciation. Vol. 3, no. 8-9-10; pp. 21-30...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1982) 3-4 (2-3-1 (8-9-10)): 5–6.
Published: 01 December 1982
... the U .S., Sawe qui peut (la vie), they are meant to be read as related pieces. We chose this way ofraising certain issues with respect to the film (violence and enunciation, pornography and eroticism, the citation of the work of Mariguerite Duras and her fictional inclusion in the film) in...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1981) 3 (1 (7)): 3–5.
Published: 01 May 1981
... © 1981 by Camera Obscura 1981 Editorial In this issue, we are continuing our previous investigation of the logic of enunciation and sexual difference as figured in the cinema by way of an analysis of Now Voyager. At the same time, we are directing attention toward a...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1979) 1-2 (3-1 (3-4)): 70–103.
Published: 01 May 1979
... series of concentric rings and waves. Fictional Representation, the Woman’s Symbolic Position, Enunciation JB: Already in the collective book Le Western (1966), while other contributors chose elements like “Indian attack,” ‘Sheriffs office,” ‘‘fistfight,” “gambler,” or “ranch” to discuss...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1990) 8 (3 (24)): 88–97.
Published: 01 September 1990
... demonstrate [de‘rnontrer]-to demonstrate its own activity as interpellation of a subject. We might say that perspective is not an e‘nonce‘ but an e‘nonci- ation and that what its e‘nonce‘ refers to is that very act of enunciation: costruzione legittima proposes in its very arrangement a...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1982) 3-4 (2-3-1 (8-9-10)): 216–222.
Published: 01 December 1982
... within the fictional world of the film. In this context, his analyses of Godard’s relation to the spectator and the film’s enunciative strategies as a whole are provocative, although there is perhaps too much of a tendency to locate an origin of enunciation in...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1980) 2 (3 (6)): 54–89.
Published: 01 December 1980
...D.N. Rodowick © 1980 by Camera Obscura 1980 Vision, Desire, and the Fib-Text D. N,Rodowick The task confronting this analysis is to try to define more precisely the relationship between the enunciation of desire and its representations in the fiction film. The...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2000) 15 (1 (43)): 163–191.
Published: 01 May 2000
... enunciative practices. Although much has been written in popular film journals about postrevolutionary Iranian cinema, it has mainly focused on issues of realism in narrative practices. This focus has inhibited a thorough discussion of the nation’s...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1979) 1-2 (3-1 (3-4)): 133–134.
Published: 01 May 1979
....” Alexandre Dumas, L’Arc, No. 71 (1978). “Hitchcock, The Enunciator.” Camera Obscura; No. 2 (Fall, 1977). (On Mamie.) “Psychose, nevrose, perversion.” Forthcoming, ca ( 1979). Trans. “Psychosis, Neurosis, Perversion.” Camera Obscura, No. 3-4 ( 1979). (On...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1982) 3-4 (2-3-1 (8-9-10)): 12–19.
Published: 01 December 1982
... character, but is, also, a question asked by and in the general fiction of the filrn (at the level of the enunciation). In the sports field scene (preceded by the title “Fear the spectator is referred several times to an “outside” of the film, and this also works against the narrow fiction, the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2004) 19 (2 (56)): 105–139.
Published: 01 September 2004
... free indirect style as a mode of cinematic perception and enunciation that complicates distinctions not only between subject and object but also between enunciator and énoncé, and ultimately between author and character. He describes this discursive structure as it mani- fests itself in films...