1-20 of 21 Search Results for

egypt

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2007) 22 (1 (64)): 137–177.
Published: 01 May 2007
... Have One Daughter and That Is Egyptian Cinema”: ‘Azı¯za Amı¯r amid the Histories and Geographies of National Allegory Kay Dickinson On Tuesday, 1 November 1927, Egypt’s daily newspaper, al-Ahra¯m, proclaimed: Silent acting has finally been born in Egypt. In the Egyptian sky a...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2003) 18 (2 (53)): 1–25.
Published: 01 September 2003
... logic to question other evaluations and constructs: country/city, here/elsewhere, France/Egypt, First World/Third World. I invoke at this point seemingly rigid bina- risms because initially this is the kind of construct that the film invites. The film is composed, after all, of two clearly...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2003) 18 (3 (54)): 41–69.
Published: 01 December 2003
... institutions in Arab countries, show that women have been integrated from the earliest days in Arab art institutions, especially in Egypt and Iraq, as artists, art teachers, curators, and employees of state arts organizations (70–91). In many Arab countries it is not difficult for women to circulate in the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2008) 23 (1 (67)): 146–150.
Published: 01 May 2008
... biblical scholar; he uses the G’Tach — the ten curses visited on Egypt — to murder the surgical team operating on his wife when she died. In Theater of Blood, Price is Edward Lionheart, a Shake- spearean actor who murders his critics in various gory ways derived from the bard’s repertoire...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2012) 27 (3 (81)): 149–157.
Published: 01 December 2012
... • Egypt/Italy, written and directed by Nadine Labaki, who also stars, the women of an imaginary village in Lebanon resolve to curtail the male- dominated strife between their Christian and Muslim families. The lm begins with women marching in unison down a dirt road after a burial, covered...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2007) 22 (3 (66)): 171–178.
Published: 01 December 2007
... new industry, as Bahiga Hafez did when she worked as a producer, director, and musical scorer. The danger of her work seems almost (but never quite) compen- sated by the astonishing existence of her frst flm, Al-Dahaia (The Victims, Egypt, 1932). Restoration here becomes a symbolic act of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2006) 21 (3 (63)): 145–151.
Published: 01 December 2006
... (Lebanon, 2005), about female sexual autonomy in Egypt. In contrast, the staid and much smaller New York Film Festival (NYFF) included just one feature film by a woman in 2005 — Dorota Kedzierzawska’s Jestem (I Am, Poland...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2008) 23 (3 (69)): 159–191.
Published: 01 December 2008
... (Conqueror of Atlantis, dir. Alfonso Brescia, Italy/Egypt, 1965) or Il gigante di Metropolis (The Giant of Metropolis, dir. Umberto Scarpelli, Italy, 1961). In at least one case, the peplum met the spaghetti Western halfway, in Sansone e il tesoro degli Incas (Hercules and the Treasure of the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2009) 24 (2 (71)): 1–41.
Published: 01 September 2009
... discourse on the decorative supplement. Blanc complains, “Our colorists go to the Orient, to Egypt, Morocco, Spain, to bring back a whole arsenal of brilliant objects; cushions, slippers, nargilehs, turbans, burnous, caftans, mats, parasols” (169). In addition to making vis- ible an anxiety of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2009) 24 (2 (71)): 107–137.
Published: 01 September 2009
... idea in her recent study of the women’s mosque movement in Egypt, anthropologist Saba Mahmood describes the veil as a key instance of what she terms “embodied behavior.”31 Arguing that “agentival capacity is entailed not only in those acts that resist norms but also in the multiple ways in...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2013) 28 (1 (82)): 103–123.
Published: 01 May 2013
... consciousness resolutely contrary to the bachelor’s fantasy. The Occupy Wall Street movement — as but one moment in a set of larger geopolitical upheavals spanning Tunisia, Egypt, Greece, Spain, Chile, the UK, Israel, and elsewhere — is notoriously ununified in its message, lacking leaders and specific...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2001) 16 (3 (48)): 83–111.
Published: 01 December 2001
... evinced a fasci- nation with the “ancient” and the so-called primitive as rendered through a litany of tropes: From Egypt where King Tutankh- amen’s tomb had been discovered in 1922, Deco embraced Pharaonic imagery (from sphinx heads and scarabs to cats). From the broader Middle East, Deco recycled...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1995) 12 (3 (36)): 84–117.
Published: 01 September 1995
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2010) 25 (2 (74)): 75–117.
Published: 01 September 2010
... ill effects of modern life.18 The Queen embodies a “savage” ethnic passion associated with Eastern Europe, Russia, and the Orient — ­she decorates her boudoir like a “harem” out of “the Arabian Nights” and conjures fantasies of imaginary travel through Egypt.19 In the novel’s American...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2016) 31 (3 (93)): 99–131.
Published: 01 December 2016
... Turkey and the overturning of repressive regimes in Tunisia and Egypt is emblematic of this tendency. Such accounts, which posit the spatial and temporal flexibility afforded by social networking as the core facilitator of revolutionary activity, are gen- erally clear in their critical position...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2000) 15 (1 (43)): 1–43.
Published: 01 May 2000
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2008) 23 (3 (69)): 1–33.
Published: 01 December 2008
... center stage, while critics in Egypt and Morocco protested its use of female nudity, the display of male impotence, and its contestation of traditional gender roles.9 The collision of contemporary political and gender concerns is certainly a heady combination in the film. Yet Khleifi utilizes...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1996) 13 (3 (39)): 4–33.
Published: 01 September 1996
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2001) 16 (1 (46)): 1–45.
Published: 01 May 2001
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2003) 18 (1 (52)): 35–83.
Published: 01 May 2003