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body schema

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2015) 30 (2 (89)): 55–87.
Published: 01 September 2015
..., Technologies of Visibility, and the Reanimation of Desire (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) and coedits the Bryn Mawr Review of Comparative Literature ( www.brynmawr.edu/bmrcl/ ). © 2015 by Camera Obscura 2015 George Cukor Joan Crawford transgender and disability female masculinity body schema...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2001) 15 (3 (45)): 115–149.
Published: 01 December 2001
... (synaesthesia), but also to the child’s reliance 04-del Rio.sh 114-149=36pg 4/18/01 4:01 PM Page 119 The Body of Voyeurism • 119 upon a corporeal schema as the ground for his/her self-image. Thus, Mark’s voyeuristic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1996) 13 (2 (38)): 92–115.
Published: 01 May 1996
...Elena del Río Copyright © 1995 by Indiana University Press 1996 The Body as Foundation of the Screen: Allegories of Technology in Atom Egoyan's Speaking Parts Elena del Rio In an uncannily unsentimental way, the work of Canadian-Armenian filmmaker Atom...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2001) 16 (3 (48)): 9–57.
Published: 01 December 2001
... a step toward rethinking the body in its material variety, the very stuff of the fan whose “mimetic fac- ulty,” in Walter Benjamin’s sense of the term, is compelled for- ward and beyond itself by the technologies of stardom. At base, my interest is to widen the conceptual and historical schema...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1990) 8 (3 (24)): 168–194.
Published: 01 September 1990
... . Berkeley: University of California, 1989 . Countess de Castigiione (Mayer and Pierson, ca. 1856-60) (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, gift of George Davis) Unspeakable Images, Unspeakable Bodies Elisabeth Lyon Now, once I feel myself observed by the lens...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2012) 27 (2 (80)): 155–160.
Published: 01 September 2012
... conflict continues to shadow any vision of what a peaceful reality might look like. Thus it is increasingly difficult to speak of sexual politics without reference to grander institutional schemas. Omar Kholeif is an Egyptian-born, UK-based writer and curator. He is currently curator at FACT...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2016) 31 (2 (92)): 149–153.
Published: 01 September 2016
... refusal of the female body's objectification and also a catalyst for collectivization. Heather Davis argues that plastic is an opaque queerness, and Nathan Lee writes on the condition of being HIV undetectable as an optimistic imperceptible relationship to one's body. Across these texts, opacity operates...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2010) 25 (2 (74)): 119–159.
Published: 01 September 2010
..., venetian blinds casting gentle Tech- nicolor shadows across the actors’ bodies) fits into what we now consider a film noir schema, while the second segment of the film in New Mexico fits into the category of the western. It becomes a woman’s picture when Ellen plays housewife, and it returns...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 129–153.
Published: 01 May 2015
... visibility in a medium where black women's bodies are often rendered invisible. Through a close examination of these cult-hit cable reality series that centers on a consideration of black women's affect, the article seeks to explore the in-betweenness of black women's performances on reality TV not to...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 25 (3 (75)): 101–141.
Published: 01 December 2011
... impossible to read it without referencing the cinematic lexicon of scopophilia, fetishism, voyeurism, the sadistic male gaze, objectification of the female body, mental images, relational images, thought cinema, the imaginary Real, the symbolic Real, and the “Real Real.” This essay traces how critical...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 26 (3 (78)): 95–135.
Published: 01 December 2011
... that Biller's relay of her own spectatorship of the sexploitation cinema represents a way of imagining female spectatorship as a form of cinephile wandering through the historical frame — and through a cathexis on the world of forgotten bodies and discarded objects, both material and cinematic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2014) 29 (2 (86)): 1–33.
Published: 01 September 2014
... director humiliates her at an audition by demanding the right to inspect her body, she begins disembodied phone sex work. Most critics of the film either emphasize the main character's growth or observe that her interiority remains unavailable to viewers despite the film's extensive use of close-ups...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1988) 6 (2 (17)): 89–111.
Published: 01 May 1988
... it has produced a useful resistance to utter acceptance of the Oedipal schema of psychoanalysis; and also that it has provoked nec- essary reconsideration of the ways in which the body figures into psychical structuration. In relation to male sexuality, both those the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2005) 20 (1 (58)): 33–57.
Published: 01 May 2005
... Obscura been buggered and its offspring is the monstrous reversible, the effect that insists on preceding its cause. This article theorizes the relationship between the Deleuzian time-image and traumatized bodies. In particular, though it is a topic elided in Deleuze’s film-theoretical texts...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 101–127.
Published: 01 May 2015
... the self, “permit individuals to effect by their own means and with the help of others a certain number of operations on their own bodies and souls, thoughts, conduct and way of being, so as to transform themselves in order to attain a certain state of happiness, purity, wisdom, perfection, or...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1986) 5 (3 (15)): 176–179.
Published: 01 December 1986
.... Bloomington, 1982. $12.50. 178 The Female Body in Western Culture: Contemporary Perspectives edited with an introduction by Susan Rubin Suleiman. Harvard University Press. Cam- bridge, Mass., 1986. $9.95. Reading Lacan by Jane Gallop. Cornell University Press. Ithaca, NY, 1985...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2001) 16 (3 (48)): 1–7.
Published: 01 December 2001
... “Technologies of Early Stardom and the Extraordinary Body.” For Bean, the wide range of female star personae con- structed in the period between 1912 and 1920 exemplify an econ- omy of “danger” and “catastrophe” that systematically destabilizes cinema’s increasingly regulated visual field. In her study...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2009) 24 (1 (70)): 37–65.
Published: 01 May 2009
... operates unequally to create robust forms of racial oppression for different subjects. He nicely summarizes Frantz Fanon’s discussion of the “racial epidermal schema” in order to articulate how both black and white subjects suffer when real black bodies are reduced to racially stereotyped images...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1985) 5 (1-2 (13-14)): 148–157.
Published: 01 September 1985
... the representation of loss, not only as loss of the child but also as loss of the maternal body, I rely very heavily on Montrelay’s reading of Eacan, her definition of the “feminine” unconscious as the imposition of “concentricity, ’ ’ an archaic oral-anal schema, upon the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2002) 17 (2 (50)): 191–217.
Published: 01 September 2002
... thought to have the potential to draw normative subjects out of Strange Days and the Subject of Mobility • 193 their psychic fixity—out of what Silverman will call the “principle of the self-same body”—and induct them into new kinds of hith- erto disavowed identifications (35). I...