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black women

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 129–153.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Kristen J. Warner This article explores the interstitial spaces between positive and negative representations of black womanhood on reality television. It argues that regardless of the presence of supposedly positive images in media, if audiences choose to see black women as “loud,” the symbolic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1995) 12 (3 (36)): 12–31.
Published: 01 September 1995
...Deborah R. Grayson Copyright © 1995 by Indiana University Press 1995 My head. Photo by Charles Moore. Is it Fake?: Black Women’s Hair as Spectacle and Spec(tac)ular Deborah R. Grayson But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2008) 23 (1 (67)): 11–45.
Published: 01 May 2008
... produced by performances across the color line, I argue that Horne's withholding exploited the conventions of the cabaret to resist the circumscribed roles available to black women performers on the Jim Crow stage. In autobiographical accounts of her early nightclub performances, she embraces what I term...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2016) 31 (2 (92)): 27–59.
Published: 01 September 2016
...Rebecca Wanzo Issa Rae's web series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl (2011–13), initially posted on YouTube, and Lena Dunham's Girls (HBO, 2012–) are examples of the precarious-girl comedy in the new millennium. These sitcoms depict women experiencing a prolonged girlhood produced not only...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2008) 23 (2 (68)): 41–66.
Published: 01 September 2008
...Catherine Zimmer This essay explores Cheryl Dunye's The Watermelon Woman (1997) in the context of reflexive practice in film. The film has been variously approached as queer cinema, women's autobiographical and documentary cinema, and black cinema; this essay emphasizes how one might add to all of...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 155–183.
Published: 01 May 2015
..., gendered, and queered affects in a variety of contemporary cultural forms. © 2015 by Camera Obscura 2015 docusoap black women melodrama queer of color camp Bravo network Figure 1. Melodramatic money shots feature a shot – reverse shot structure while emphasizing performance of negative affects...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2013) 28 (2 (83)): 77–107.
Published: 01 September 2013
... trope often goes, the black mother is incapable and unloving, embodying two stereotypes that Patricia Hill Collins sums up as the dominant cultural images of black women — welfare mother and black matriarch2 — albeit in Precious  both are pushed to extremes of perverse monstrosity. Bullock’s...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2009) 24 (1 (70)): 67–107.
Published: 01 May 2009
... trademark, the present essay argues that anxieties about the media exposure and commodification of white women that saturated the legal texts of media privacy were correlative to the spectacular forms of exposure and commodification of black subjects routine in the era's commercial print culture. This...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1995) 12 (3 (36)): 6–11.
Published: 01 September 1995
...Deborah R. Grayson Copyright © 1995 by Indiana University Press 1995 Waiting to Exhale (Forrest Whittaker, 1995) Introduction Deborah R. Grayson As individual citizens and as performance and visual artists, Black women have struggled to gain control over their representation...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1990) 8 (2 (23)): 108–131.
Published: 01 May 1990
... culture) probably perceive rap to reflect the violent, brutally sexist reality of a pack of wilding “little Willie Hor- tons.”l Consequently, you would wonder what a group of young black women rappers were doing fraternizing with these male rappers and why they seemed to be having such a good...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 100–103.
Published: 01 December 1989
... 1. My involvement with the concept of the female spectator originated with my study of Black women and their reactions to the film The Color Purple. There were diverse and conflicting responses to the work from Black people in general, but Black women in large numbers were...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1995) 12 (3 (36)): 32–48.
Published: 01 September 1995
... success story Often in media and film, violence in black women’s lives is treated as an inherent liability of their color and sex. For “subtle’’ and graphic visceral examples consider respectively the “near” rape scene in Spike Lee’s She’s Got to Have It and the brutal gang rape of the black...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1989) 7 (2-3 (20-21)): 94–100.
Published: 01 December 1989
... the formation of Camera Obscura can be found in “Chronology” Camera Obscura 314 (1979), 5-13. Jacqueline Bobo 1. My involvement with the concept of the female spectator originated with my study of Black women and their reactions to the film The...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1995) 12 (3 (36)): 154.
Published: 01 September 1995
... women of color’s subjectivity towards the twenty- first century. Deborah R. Grayson is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Rochester. She is currently working on a book manuscript on Black women, health, and beauty culture. Joy James teaches feminism and political theory...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1990) 8 (2 (23)): 4–7.
Published: 01 May 1990
... historicity in order to better understand their scholarly endeavors. The next four essays all deal with aspects of contemporary popular culture, focusing particularly on television and music. Tricia Rose’s “Never Trust a Big Butt and a Smile” shows how black women rappers have...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1995) 12 (3 (36)): 158–160.
Published: 01 September 1995
... Nineties. No. 33-34; pp. 133-146. Flinn, Caryl The Deaths of Camp. No. 35; pp. 53-86. Gant-Britton, Lisbeth African Women and Visual Culture: A Sample Syllabus. No 36; pp. 85-118 Grayson, Deborah R. Introduction to Black Women, Spectatorship...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1994) 11-12 (3-1 (33-34)): 264.
Published: 01 May 1994
... Imagination by Annette Kuhn. Verso, 1995. $17.95. Another Frank Capra by Leland Poague. Cambridge University Press, 1995. $54.95. Black Women as Cultural Readers by Jacqueline Bobo. Columbia University Press, 1995. $16.50. ...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1990) 8 (2 (23)): 8–41.
Published: 01 May 1990
... enjoyed a certain autonomy in constructing a cultural “black world,” relatively free from overt white intervention.” The urban black class structure in this era has been described as a markedly truncated pyramid, with the majority of black men and women laboring in low-paying industrial...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1995) 12 (3 (36)): 66–83.
Published: 01 September 1995
... similar process inflects the creation and circulation of work by many Black women artists whose work specifically addresses the meaning and politics of these images. As artists, we share a common interest in the histories, discussions, and the cultural values that surround...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1990) 8 (1 (22)): 159–166.
Published: 01 January 1990
... central struc- turing principles. The film opens with a serious female voice-over ruminating on issues of black female identity and history. As the camera pans photos of black African and British women and girls, the voice asks, “why do you hide from me, my lovely...