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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1994) 11-12 (3-1 (33-34)): 242–261.
Published: 01 May 1994
...Thomas Streeter; Wendy Wahl Copyright © 1994 by Indiana University Press 1994 Peter Malarkey, “Inside Chicago” 1993. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Martin-Zambito Fine Art, Seattle, Washington. Audience Theory and Feminism: Property, Gender, and the Television Audience...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1990) 8 (2 (23)): 90–107.
Published: 01 May 1990
...Richard deCordova Copyright © 1990 by The Johns Hopkins University Press 1990 Ethnography and Exhibition: The Child Audience, the Hays Office and Saturday Matinees Richard deCordova Everybody is talking about the movies, about what is...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2017) 32 (2 (95)): 89–115.
Published: 01 September 2017
... address of the show to its online fandom, an audience employing channels of expression from which young people are effectively excluded. These developments function to marginalize the series' core audience—“little girls”—in a process of appropriation and redefinition that ultimately serves the interests...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1988) 6 (1 (16)): 154–168.
Published: 01 January 1988
...Robert H. Deming Copyright © 1988 by The Johns Hopkins University Press 1988 Kate and Allie Kate and Allie: "New Women" and the Audience's Television Archive Robert H. Deming Network television rediscovered the "new woman" again in the Fall 1984 season. Several prime...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2012) 27 (3 (81)): 149–157.
Published: 01 December 2012
...Roya Rastegar Festivals not only select and exhibit films, they also call in audiences and shape the conditions in which these audiences engage with cinema. Drawing from the author's changing personal relationship to cinema culture, and engaging with eleven films that premiered at the 2012 Sundance...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 26 (3 (78)): 95–135.
Published: 01 December 2011
...Elena Gorfinkel American sexploitation cinema of the 1960s and early 1970s has gained a second life in the past two decades through a boom in video and DVD distribution and rerelease, and consequently a new, generationally distinct audience. This article proposes that what appeals to cult audiences...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2008) 23 (1 (67)): 11–45.
Published: 01 May 2008
... an “unperforming of the self” through the cultivation of an impersonal intimacy that deferred a fixed subjectivity and frustrated the racial expectations of her audiences. She developed this impersona through three interlocking tactics: a disarticulation of self and song; a reversal of the psychic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2008) 23 (3 (69)): 159–191.
Published: 01 December 2008
... bodies are constantly on display and evidently eroticized. The beefcake on display in the peplum is clearly not meant for a straight female audience (the films are rarely more than a series of demonstrations of violent physical strength, often haphazardly strung together), and the films were too widely...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2011) 26 (2 (77)): 65–89.
Published: 01 September 2011
... roots to a collection of British programs offering advice to parents in the late 1990s and early 2000s, as well as to the longer-standing British tradition of public service broadcasting that sought to “better its audience,” we argue that the program departs from that legacy in its commercialization...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2012) 27 (1 (79)): 31–67.
Published: 01 May 2012
... multilayered network of mutual dependency and interactive/interpassive reconfigurations. The article asks in what ways the Twilight films construct or imagine their targeted audience — teenage girls, Twilight moms, and gay men — and how such desires are then consumed, multiplied, and circulated on textual...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2012) 27 (3 (81)): 1–37.
Published: 01 December 2012
... ideas of racial progress and recombines them with different narratives and ideologies so that audiences may receive them as new and cut off from history. By centering its finale on the survival of one genetically idealized child, Battlestar constructs a new narrative context for an old story that...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2013) 28 (1 (82)): 1–35.
Published: 01 May 2013
... filmmakers exploit what I term the audience's cruel knowledge about actresses in order to position the films in relation to the other art forms associated with their actresses (ballet and pornography). Building from the premise that spectacle and excess are necessary to both celebrity and cruelty, I argue...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2015) 30 (3 (90)): 1–25.
Published: 01 December 2015
... Romanticism, transforming her into a commodity to be marketed to a modern mass theatrical audience. At the same time, this essay argues that the film questions its own use of spectacle, in particular CinemaScope and Eastman Color, to present its notorious heroine as an object of spectacle for contemporary...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 129–153.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Kristen J. Warner This article explores the interstitial spaces between positive and negative representations of black womanhood on reality television. It argues that regardless of the presence of supposedly positive images in media, if audiences choose to see black women as “loud,” the symbolic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2015) 30 (1 (88)): 185–195.
Published: 01 May 2015
... perfect fit between a niche audience and a boutique show. In addition, the article suggests that the audience is already embedded in the show through affective economies, product placement, extradiegetic activities like blogging, and a more intimate relationship with television executives than ever before...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2017) 32 (2 (95)): 175–183.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Dietrich Squinkifer Coffee: A Misunderstanding is a mobile device–assisted interactive play that explores a fan/creator relationship and the many twists and turns such a relationship can take. The two protagonists, always played by audience members, are Twitter acquaintances who first meet in...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2009) 24 (2 (71)): 107–137.
Published: 01 September 2009
... relating its message almost exclusively through its protagonist's point of view, the film highlights her individuality, eliding the broader Moroccan feminist and cultural movements in which Benlyazid's film claims to intervene. For transnational feminist audiences, Benlyazid's film thus stages, whether...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2009) 24 (2 (71)): 139–159.
Published: 01 September 2009
...K K Seet The rarely analyzed Asian horror film, which has had great impact on international film audiences recently as a result of Hollywood remakes, is increasingly mired in the milieu of home and hearth, leading to a new Asian variation of the domestic gothic. With specific reference to Japan's...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 25 (3 (75)): 69–99.
Published: 01 December 2011
...” Western audiences about oppression on the “dark continent.” The article focuses on the respective story lines, which indict Western corporations, and on the directors' manipulation of lightness and darkness as a means of literally rendering Western exploitation visible. Despite this potential, however...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 2010) 25 (2 (74)): 183–195.
Published: 01 September 2010
...” Michelle, and the limits of what it can convey to its audience. Maitra shows how the diffused, “middling” presence of Hima's camera locates Lopez in the middle of her contradictory emotions, and gives viewers a sense of her statelessness, of the unnerving position of being both contained and dispossessed...