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apocalypse film

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2020) 35 (1 (103)): 139–159.
Published: 01 May 2020
... conducting interviews with the last 186 survivors of a plague in San Francisco, the film is not without major flaws: in true San Fran- cisco fashion, everyone s sideburns are immaculate twelve years after the apocalypse, and, more troubling (though perhaps equally indicative of a singular worldview), about...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1986) 5 (3 (15)): 66–85.
Published: 01 December 1986
... and A Boy and His Dog come readily to mind), there are others which try to point to present tendencies that seem likely to result in corporate totalitarianism, apocalypse, or both. Although The Terminator gives us one of the most horrifying post- apocalyptic visions of any recent film, it falls...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1986) 5 (3 (15)): 3–5.
Published: 01 December 1986
... The Terminator as the starting point for a discussion of the way recent science fiction film uses various structures of fantasy (the primal scene, family romance, infantile sexual investigation) to en- sure the spectator’s psychical involvement in scenarios of technology and apocalypse, sexuality...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1982) 3-4 (2-3-1 (8-9-10)): 161–185.
Published: 01 December 1982
...Jean-Luc Godard; Pauline Kael Copyright © 1982 by Camera Obscura 1982 The Economics of Film Criticism: A Debate Jean-Luc Godard and Pauline Kael Jean-Luc Godard: All right, you want me to begin? Pauline Kael: Please. J-LG: Do you know how long this is supposed to go...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1993) 11 (1 (31)): 149–151.
Published: 01 May 1993
... McAuliffe. Duke University Press, 1994. $16.95. Remote Control: Power, Cultures, and the World of Appearances by Barbara Kruger. MIT Press, 1993. $19.95. (Vampires): An Uneasy Essay on the Undead in Film by Jala Toufic. Station Hill Press, 1993. $12.95. 150 Mediating Two Worlds: Cinematic...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2016) 31 (1 (91)): 65–91.
Published: 01 May 2016
.... In the final scene, this narrowly avoided apocalypse forcefully unplugs humans everywhere from their technological extensions, causing them to encounter their peers face-­to-­face for the first time. The film thus takes the issue of prosthetic mediation to its logical end, exploring...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1997) 14 (1-2 (40-41)): 161–179.
Published: 01 May 1997
... of understanding and responding to our personal and national past. Speaking of the Lawrence Kasden film Body Heat, which, Jameson submits, has blurred all the markers of its time period to suggest “some eternal thirties, beyond real historical time,” Jame- son posits: This [film’s] approach...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2002) 17 (2 (50)): 69–107.
Published: 01 September 2002
...A. Samuel Kimball Camera Obscura 2002 A. Samuel Kimball is an associate professor of English at the University of North Florida. His publications on film include articles on Twin Peaks, Pulp Fiction, The Matrix , and Chinatown . He has recently completed a book-length study...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1986) 5 (3 (15)): 6–35.
Published: 01 December 1986
..., and the apocalypse that follows from their provoked and “childishly” unselective fury is seen as somehow deserved. Correlatively, we can see the contemporary horror film’s earlier representation of parents as bewildered, foolish, and blindly trusting victims of their ungrateful and aberrant children...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1997) 14 (1-2 (40-41)): 42–74.
Published: 01 May 1997
... stuff- ing, Kodak film, Milky Way candy bar, and Rice Krispies. These days aliens are no longer confined to science fiction and Elvis-obsessed tabloids. Instead they make the front pages of The New Yo& Times and The Wall Streetlournal. It is an alien age, an age of aliens. The X...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1997) 14 (1-2 (40-41)): 226–242.
Published: 01 May 1997
... transference of the imperceptible radiation onto the conspicuous carnosaur. The film evokes fears of uncontainable radiation and nuclear holocaust only to contain them in the dinosaur, using the prehistoric metonym of extinc- tion to veil the contemporary threat of apocalypse. Though it is absurd...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2011) 26 (2 (77)): 123–130.
Published: 01 September 2011
...Francesca Coppa Vidding is a thirty-year-old remix practice in which predominantly female media fans reedit television or film into music videos. Vidding is important not only as an art form in its own right but also as a subcultural — and often feminist — reinterpretation of and confrontation...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2012) 27 (3 (81)): 39–67.
Published: 01 December 2012
...Chris Dumas The problem of the “it was all a dream” structure is considered, particularly in reference to its appearance in the year 1953. This article compares three films featuring the dream structure — Robot Monster (dir. Phil Tucker, US), The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T (dir. Roy Rowland, US...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1999) 14 (3 (42)): 96–123.
Published: 01 September 1999
... and Desire (1953), as well as Paths of Glory (1957) and Dr. Strange• love (1964). Here, however, I want to focus on Full Metal Jacket's refiguration of the Vietnam War-against the precedent established by Apocalypse Now and the many Vietnam films that followed in its wake-as an urban conflict, one...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (2 (89)): 1–27.
Published: 01 September 2015
... iconically, atomic bomb explosions. In these two early films, Conner casts women as literal bombshells by repeatedly linking female sexuality to the existential threat posed by nuclear apocalypse. Yet in BREAKAWAY, Conner modifies this dualistic logic of sex versus death in order to pursue a more...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2015) 30 (3 (90)): 1–25.
Published: 01 December 2015
... with Romanticism, transforming her into a commodity to be marketed to a modern mass theatrical audience. At the same time, this essay argues that the film questions its own use of spectacle, in particular CinemaScope and Eastman Color, to present its notorious heroine as an object of spectacle for contemporary...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1991) 9 (1-2 (25-26)): 250–273.
Published: 01 September 1991
... unlimited replay, of the murder and of what took place afterwards. When the film was first released, the Mayor of Milpitas, together with the “city fathers,” led a successful campaign to ban it from being shown in the town. Milpitas Citizen of the Year, housewife Fifi Bradley...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1986) 5 (3 (15)): 86–109.
Published: 01 December 1986
... injuries refurbished our pessimism, setting us to brood upon apocalypse. With the situation so grim below, how could we remain sanguine about the good intentions of celestial messengers? Through that ob- scure feedback process by which the cinematic dream factory translates inchoate collective...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2017) 32 (3 (96)): 93–119.
Published: 01 December 2017
.... In contradistinction to popular readings that view Yunioshi as a regrettable mark on an otherwise untainted film, the essay shows how the character of Yunioshi served not merely as a comedic stereotype but as a technology of race, sexuality, and gender that helped mediate the problems the producers encountered...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1995) 12 (2 (35)): 129–157.
Published: 01 May 1995
...Catherine Russell Hara Setsuko in End ofSummer (Ozu Yasujiro, 1961). "Overcoming Modernity": Gender and the Pathos of History in Japanese Film Melodrama Catherine Russell Although this seemed unpalatable to Westerners...