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aboriginal

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2014) 29 (1 (85)): 81–109.
Published: 01 May 2014
...Therese Davis The article looks at the contributions of writer and director Darlene Johnson to an emerging Australian Indigenous cinema. It discusses the ways in which Johnson draws on her experience as a young, urban Indigenous woman and her knowledge of Aboriginal culture to explore the...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2016) 31 (3 (93)): 5–33.
Published: 01 December 2016
... soap operas, as seen in Ceci est un message de l’ideologie dominante (This Is a Message from the Dominant Ideology, Groupe Intervention Vidéo, Canada, 1975); the occupation of Canada’s Department of Indian Affairs (now known as Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada) by Aboriginal women, which...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2009) 24 (3 (72)): 111–151.
Published: 01 December 2009
... was born outside Brisbane on an Aboriginal mission called Cherbourg and then “fostered out to a white family.”49 Though raised by an older white woman, she nevertheless nourished an ongoing relationship with her birth mother and Aboriginal community, her hybrid back- ground and education...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 1984) 4 (3 (12)): 40–65.
Published: 01 December 1984
... intoxicating mixture of all three. It’s hard to say when the genre became socially recognizable as such: but it was already possible in 1877 - when the Europeans’ Australia was not, and Aboriginal Australia never had been, a nation - for Marcus Clarke to parody (i.e., critically...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 January 1992) 10 (1 (28)): 134–151.
Published: 01 January 1992
... early eighties, MacDougall and his wife, Judith MacDougall, produced a number of films in Australia for Aboriginal communities who requested that their rituals or political activism be documented. But it was the coming of the camcorder that actually brought...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2016) 31 (3 (93)): 153–163.
Published: 01 December 2016
... of the North (Aboriginal Peoples Television Net- work, 2011), the documentary feature Sol (dir. Marie-Hélène­ Cousineau and Madeleine Ivalu, Canada, 2014), and the feature films Le jour avant le lendemain (Before Tomorrow, dir. Marie-Hélène­ Cousineau and Madeleine Ivalu, Canada, 2008) and...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 2016) 31 (1 (91)): 5–25.
Published: 01 May 2016
... the University of Toronto. She is author of Unsettling Sights: The Fourth World on Film (2010), a monograph about the construction of Aboriginality in contemporary cinema, and coeditor, with Sophie Mayer, of There She Goes: Feminist Filmmaking and Beyond (2009), an anthology dedicated to the flows...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 December 2011) 25 (3 (75)): 143–177.
Published: 01 December 2011
... . . . to see if [Navajo] films would be based on a different film ‘grammar’ based on Navajo worldview . . . focused overmuch on the filmic rather than the social frame.”16 In contrast, she describes the use of video by Australian Aboriginal people as “innovations in both filmic representation...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 September 1996) 13 (3 (39)): 77–103.
Published: 01 September 1996
... as a smiling tribesman, dressed in a loin cloth, chanting, and rubbing a long stick between his palms; Australia follows in the guise of an Africanized Aboriginal, dressed in grass skirt and gold hoop earrings, carrying a leather shield; and Asia closes the line-up of "others...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies (1 May 1997) 14 (1-2 (40-41)): 199–225.
Published: 01 May 1997
... that baseball’s “genesis in aboriginal myth and ritual give it a depth of cultural substance similar to that found in other mythologies and human customs,” and that when it emerged as a formal leisure activity in the US, the gender and racial exclusivity enforced by the gentlemen’s clubs that...