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Black visual culture

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Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2020) 35 (3 (105)): 132–141.
Published: 01 December 2020
...Jasmine Nichole Cobb In this interview, artist and scholar Deborah Willis describes the work of excavating and organizing the history of Black photography. Willis’s groundbreaking scholarship helped to formally establish an archive of Black visual practice before libraries and cultural institutions...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2009) 24 (1 (70)): 67–107.
Published: 01 May 2009
.... Hortense Spillers has justly used the term pornotroping to describe this form of American racial reification.21 In slavery’s visual regimes, as Spillers observes, the spectacularization of black embodiment 80  •  Camera Obscura becomes lodged in the American cultural consciousness...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2020) 35 (2 (104)): 37–61.
Published: 01 September 2020
... Billops (as Girl #1, Girl #2, Girl #3, and Girl #4) in Selma (dir. Ava DuVernay, 2014) How can visual culture represent African American subject- hood when the systems of governance themselves fail and refuse to represent African American interests? I suggest here that the reception and criticism of black...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1995) 12 (3 (36)): 6–11.
Published: 01 September 1995
... their representation in visual and cultural media. They have fought to deploy diverse images of Black womanhood. Through an analysis of film, television, art, and beauty culture, among other media, the essays in this special issue of Camera Obscura on Black women, spectatorship, and visual culture speak...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2013) 28 (2 (83)): 1–43.
Published: 01 September 2013
..., a visual relation rather than a visual object. In pursuing a way to understand the blackness of black cinema and art, it is important to recognize and yet resist, or at least problema- tize, the tendency for blackness to attach to something (whether it is a body, an object, or a cultural expression...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1995) 12 (3 (36)): 66–83.
Published: 01 September 1995
... and political power distribution. In the essay, “Modernism, Postmodernism and the Problem of the Visual in Afro-American Culture,” Michele Wallace addresses the challenges of representing Black Americans. By way of Ralph Ellison’s 1951 novel, The Invisible Man, she expresses the paradox...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2009) 24 (1 (70)): 37–65.
Published: 01 May 2009
...: Routledge, 1994), 78. 39. David Marriot, Haunted Life: Visual Culture and Black Modernity (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2007), 2. 40. Dean, Publicity’s Secret, 170. 41. Following Slavoj Žižek and Claude Lévi-Strauss, Dean suggests that the Web is a “zero...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1996) 13 (2 (38)): 116–131.
Published: 01 May 1996
... federally-funded arts work so bleakly, it is erroneous to characterize early nineties African-American cinema production in the same terms. Dash's work should be situated within the context of this other cultural narrative, that is, in relation to what some have called an explosion in Black film...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2011) 26 (1 (76)): 65–93.
Published: 01 May 2011
... engaging in various hard-­core sex acts. But beyond exhibiting our fascination with real celebri- ties having real sex, a fascination that the celebrity genre of porn and the current culture of celebrity reality television so vividly elu- The Black Visual Experience...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1995) 12 (3 (36)): 12–31.
Published: 01 September 1995
... significance for many Black peo- ple-perhaps especially for Black women.3 Because we live in a culture where visual images affect our relations as human beings, the choices Black women make about hairstyle or body appearance often mean the difference between acceptance or rejection by groups...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2014) 29 (2 (86)): 1–33.
Published: 01 September 2014
... sound, are exemplary films where spectacular black visuality sits alongside formal and technical innovation. While many cultural studies approaches proceed from the deployment of black visuality in processes of establishing whiteness as the nor­ mative ground of cinematic representation...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2008) 23 (3 (69)): 35–79.
Published: 01 December 2008
... theatrical tradition from Mata Hari to Loie Fuller to Clara Bow?22 How would our understanding of the visual culture surrounding the black female body be refined were we to consider the (racial, national, and sexual) heterogeneity of Baker’s style, not to mention of her audiences...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2020) 35 (1 (103)): 109–137.
Published: 01 May 2020
... transnationally even as I locate my analysis in the specificities of the global war and visual culture s absorp- tion of that war. I offer ethical whiteness as a theoretical interven- tion that generates an account of white violence against black and brown people globally as reliant on both a persistent...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2009) 24 (1 (70)): 177–207.
Published: 01 May 2009
.... A critical theorist of literature and film, James Snead pro- vides the postscript for the essay with his theory of blackness as a “sign of repetition.” His philosophical and aesthetic argument — he writes of modernity and Modernism — describes a system of valu- ation in Western culture that has entered...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2009) 24 (1 (70)): 7–35.
Published: 01 May 2009
... century to that of cultural anthropologists in the twentieth. Frederick Doug- lass, in his commencement address at Western Reserve College in 1854, famously contended that similarities between the bodies of Irish workers and black slaves undermined theories of racial traits as inherent or natural...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2016) 31 (2 (92)): 195–203.
Published: 01 September 2016
... Bloc’s black paisley bandanas and black hoodies are accessible visual resistance devices easily reproducible and used as a collective motif capable of crossing borders and countries to vocalize discontent).11 The question of invisibility and masking practices as ways of escape and political...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1993) 11 (2 (32)): 124–160.
Published: 01 September 1993
... culture. Calling for a new theorization of the black male body, Mercer insists that “it is in the domain of race, whose violent and sexy phantasia haunts America daily, that our need for an understanding of the psychic reality of phantasy, and its effect in the body politic, is greate~tIn only...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (2001) 15 (3 (45)): 195–225.
Published: 01 December 2001
... these aspects of paranoia, but here they combine in an explicit cross- examination of television as a visual medium that might border on being a tool for hypnosis and control. The show pokes fun at the fantasy that television might, like the black oil, sneak...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1992) 10 (3 (30)): 4–33.
Published: 01 May 1992
... speech in Hearts in Dixie, a 1929 sound film that features a nearly all-black cast.33 In her response to the film-which she claims is her first exposure to the talkie-Richardson addresses the spread of cultural knowledge that accompanies the ad- vent of sound. She stages...
Journal Article
Camera Obscura (1995) 12 (3 (36)): 134–153.
Published: 01 September 1995
... the applicability of a Black Fine Arts aesthetic to popular visual culture. Furthermore, her icon allows the issue of gender to enter the forum of Black cultural politics. Icons of Black popular culture are marketed through the construc- tion of certain aesthetic characteristics. Stuart Hall points...