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phonetics

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2021) 48 (4): 7–14.
Published: 01 November 2021
... but intertwined with trivia drawn from B Hollywood movies and accounting for the title itself of the poem. As the making of meaning, especially in the second part of the text, is driven by phonetic equivalences rather than by referential affinities, readers are alerted that ontophony has been chosen as a modus...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2024) 51 (2): 19–38.
Published: 01 May 2024
... to attune their ears to ways of listening that leverage machinic prostheses and to be aware of the dangers that come with such newfound abilities. mustazza@sas.upenn.edu Copyright ©2024 by Duke University Press 2024 sound surveillance speech poetry phonetics After a recent lecture...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (2): 155–185.
Published: 01 May 2010
... adopted the Greek alphabet to express itself phonetically in English.”1 The nineteenth and twentieth centuries each generated many and various projects of linguistic modernization. Among these, the Turkish lan- guage reforms, which included the replacement of Ottoman Turkish script by Latin...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2023) 50 (4): 97–116.
Published: 01 November 2023
... disconcerting. “Mensch” is visually and phonetically close to man/men in English but is distorted by the German-sounding ending -nsch . Bernstein ( 2004 : 202) in his later translation keeps “Mensch,” now written with a capital letter and in italics, the only word in his translation marked that way. He...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (2): 143–160.
Published: 01 May 2012
...- formation, at once singular and collective, generative and ambivalent. One way that al-Shidyaq forges his ambivalent philological chains of becoming is through seemingly impossible lists of synonyms linked together through phonetic and semantic resonance and dissonance...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2011) 38 (2): 67–123.
Published: 01 May 2011
... it and the late Qing language movement. For instance, in his preface to A Phonetic Alpha- bet for Mandarin (Guanhua hesheng zimu), Wang Zhao wrote, When people of our nation created characters in ancient times, in order to make them more convenient for people to use, it was a set...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2007) 34 (2): 1–20.
Published: 01 May 2007
... in this set of conven- tions was the use of “eye dialect,”23 in which the social superiority of the writer is established by phonetically misspelling words that even the most precise standard speakers would say just as did the dialect speaker (wuz for was; sez for says). But this technique plays...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2023) 50 (4): 171–194.
Published: 01 November 2023
... is automatized and consequently underarticulated: only so much of the material aspect of words is presented as to enable their recognition. By contrast, poetry is composed in a language that is slowed down, fully articulated, and phonetically more difficult. Overall, the language of communication pays attention...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (3): 205–228.
Published: 01 August 2009
... syllables together and forms them into a note or a tone of voice. In his recently completed novella The Beach of Falesà R L S had hoped to picture the modern world of the Pacific—phonetically. “You will know more about the South Seas after you have read my little tale, than...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2024) 51 (2): 39–68.
Published: 01 May 2024
...,” but is also used colloquially in compounds to refer to container-like body parts, like the chest or torso. 통 is a homophone as well, meaning “pain” (痛). The two hanja characters associated with tong are differentiated by their radicals, the marks added to the phonetic reference 甬. The radical...
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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (3): 49–61.
Published: 01 August 2009
... remember me In history not a mystery or a memory Rakim’s Dasein struggled against the parochialism of his grounding origins, and the reality that is worlding supernovaed atomically out of his ’hood through his phonetic applications. The beginning shall be the end and internal...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (1): 219–248.
Published: 01 February 2016
... ones. This, despite the fact that English shares with German the etymological and phonetic linkage between the words, dialekt/dialect and dialektic/dialectic—an artifact of their shared roots. In 1847, Marx could write, somewhat sardonically, that it was Proud- hon who had made him speak...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2015) 42 (3): 63–77.
Published: 01 August 2015
... second-­in-­command, then takes care of the meaning.”16 Second, is there not a strange power in the emperor’s voice inso- far as it conveyed a familiar phonetic value in his accent, intonation, and timbre, yet simultaneously a logos that was largely incomprehensible to the masses...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (3): 253–286.
Published: 01 August 2016
... this backwardness was tied to China’s eco- nomic backwardness, the solution was economic development.40 38. “To create a new China language—use romanized pinyin or phonetic characters, and a country wide common language” 39. Edward Sapir, Language: An Introduction to the Study of Speech (New York: Har...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (2): 75–110.
Published: 01 May 2012
... as inhering in its lexical, syntactical, and phonetic levels, Orientalism proposed that the active and dynamic processes that were at work in the vernacular were most clearly visible, and most amenable to study and classification, through the Orientalist scientific apparatus. Fort William was thus part...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (2): 183–213.
Published: 01 May 2013
... was commemorated at the Baku Turcological Congress, along with Wilhelm Radloff, as a foundational figure of mod- ern Turcology. He also introduced a new “phonetic method” (usul-i­ savtiye) in the 1880s for primary school instruction in Turkic. On Gaspıralı as a modernist, see Edward J. Laz- zerini...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2023) 50 (1): 69–104.
Published: 01 February 2023
..., characterized by its cultural and territorial continuity. Jakobson echoes this vision of the autonomy and totality of Eurasia in his theory of a Eurasian linguistic union. He argues that languages are not only bound by shared families, inherited vocabularies, grammars, and phonetic traits but also language...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2015) 42 (4): 123–138.
Published: 01 November 2015
..., innovation now occurs between and within phrases and sentences, and Roberson’s deployment of phonetic spelling, parataxis, and nonmetrical spacing recalls more the jazz of the Black Arts Movement and the oral traditions of the Black Mountain School than it does, say, recent Language Writing experi...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2021) 48 (4): 15–63.
Published: 01 November 2021
... the work that exists in that unwritten space that is almost being accessed that becomes so fascinating. A wonderful thing about poetry that foregrounds its visual dimension is that it plays with resisting the phonetic. But at the same time, I'm fascinated when such a visual poem becomes the basis...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2021) 48 (3): 31–54.
Published: 01 August 2021
... with the meaning of the Spanish words amor (love) and habitar (to inhabit), combining them to form Jiménez's term hamor (love + inhabiting), a homonym of amor , given the silent h according to Spanish phonetics. 25. This idea relates to the social transformation process E. P. Thompson describes...