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pamuk

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (2): 59–72.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Bruce Robbins In this interview, conducted at Columbia University in the fall of 2013, Turkish Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk discusses the trajectory of his own novels, what has and has not changed in the genre's social aspirations and challenges, its characteristic topics and settings, its...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (3): 123–149.
Published: 01 August 2010
...R. A. Judy “Literature,” Orhan Pamuk once remarked, “is the greatest treasure we, humanity, have to discuss and to understand ourselves; and now, the most popular, most intelligent, most flexible form of literature today, in the last two hundred years in fact, is the great art of the novel.” This...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (3): 79–89.
Published: 01 August 2010
... only imagine that writing about European literature in Istan- bul, a city where East and West at once collide and merge, would prove to stimulate dynamic and active reading. The Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk sees East and West as the “two spirits of Turkey as one.” He also views the “eternal...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (2): 71–89.
Published: 01 May 2020
... .” In Approaches to Teaching Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina , edited by Knapp L. Mandelker A. , 60 – 66 . New York : Modern Language Association of America . Pamuk Orhan . 2004 . Snow . Translated by Freely Maureen . New York : Random House . Rancière Jacques . 2003...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2015) 42 (2): 177–193.
Published: 01 May 2015
... Woolf famously lamented in letters and diary entries that he had “solidified what has always escaped” and that “Nothing seems left to do. All seems insipid and worthless.” More recently, Orhan Pamuk wryly commented in an interview, “When Proust wrote on love, everybody read it as universal love...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2007) 34 (1): 209–213.
Published: 01 February 2007
..., Oh Jung-hee, Sung Suk-je, Paik Nakchung, and Kim Seong-kon from Korea, and Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Le Clézio, Margaret Drabble, Gary Snyder, Oe Kenzaburo, Jean Baudrillard, Orhan Pamuk, Bei Dao, and others from boundary 2 34:1 (2007)  DOI 10.1215/01903659-2006-033  © 2007 by Duke University Press...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (1): 155–189.
Published: 01 February 2013
... works are increasingly anxious to stage their political implications. So, in a very different context, they erupt into the fury of the lead Islamist in Snow, Orhan Pamuk’s politi- cal novel about the battles around religion in contemporary Turkey. In the 158 boundary 2 / Spring 2013 novel...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (2): 5–17.
Published: 01 May 2020
... Ralph Ellison. Without all the turbulence that Dostoevsky inflicted on those writers, a turbulence still active in Orhan Pamuk s Snow, we would never have cared enough to make us want the amazing story that Frank so painstakingly composed at such length in pages and time. Dostoevsky emerges from Frank s...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 55–66.
Published: 01 May 2009
... instance of this struc- ture, no longer so confident, comes in Orhan Pamuk’s Snow, in which a novelist reconstructs the life of a poet, whose verse is discussed but never 20. See Ronald AT. Judy, “Provisional Note on Formations of Planetary Violence,” bound- ary 2 33, no. 3 (Fall 2006): 141–50. 21...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (2): 179–204.
Published: 01 May 2016
... text crosses cultural borders. A reception-­ oriented anthology could pose such questions as why, in the current Anglo- phone canon of world literature, writers like Orhan Pamuk, Roberto Bolaño, and Yoko Tawada have displaced Italo Calvino, Gabriel García Márquez, and Assia Djebar as focuses of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (3): 7–27.
Published: 01 August 2012
... has been done. Joseph Conrad is one example, Vladimir Nabokov is another. They both switched their mother language for the lan- guage of their choice. Orhan Pamuk is yet another example—he didn’t have to switch languages. Yet these are above all moral issues, it seems to me. This is to say that...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2005) 32 (3): 97–117.
Published: 01 August 2005
... colleagues—George Steiner, Paul de Man, Fredric Jameson—must rely on translations for the Koran, Orhan Pamuk, Dostoyevsky, The Tale of Genji And I think it would be a shame if critics stimulated by work from all over the planet felt disqualified from comment on anything in languages in which they lack...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2006) 33 (2): 203–234.
Published: 01 May 2006