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Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2002) 29 (2): 109–127.
Published: 01 May 2002
...David Palumbo-Liu Duke University Press 2002 Multiculturalism Now: Civilization, National Identity, and Difference Before and After September 11th David Palumbo-Liu The events of September 11th and following have been shocking be...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2003) 30 (1): 191–197.
Published: 01 February 2003
...Kevin McLaughlin Duke University Press 2003 y 2 / 30:1 / sheet 195 of 224 6808 boundar Benjamin Now: Afterthoughts on The Arcades Project Kevin McLaughlin...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2005) 32 (3): 1–20.
Published: 01 August 2005
...Lindsay Waters Lindsay Waters 2005 Is Now the Time for Paul de Man? An Address to Members of the Modern Language Association on the Twentieth Anniversary of Paul de Man’s Death Lindsay Waters And so let us then—by light and by...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2013) 40 (3): 87–98.
Published: 01 August 2013
... was radically subversive. But why should we need, or even be interested in, Lucretius now? Greenblatt’s narrative is not new, and in it he misinterprets the role atomism plays in our lives. Atomism is no longer a liberating idea; this essay argues that it is the very thing that incapacitates us today...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2015) 42 (3): 113–127.
Published: 01 August 2015
...Tom Looser For some time now, Japan has been teetering on the point of fundamental, historical transformation. Neoliberalist contractions, natural catastrophes, and the nuclear disaster have contributed to an era of crisis that is local to Japan, while they are also an ongoing bellwether of global...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 November 2018) 45 (4): 1–12.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Colin Dayan In the dark drama and shock tactics of the Trump White House, I found myself obsessed with Dorothy Dandridge, a woman I had been quite unaware of until now. In following her traces, I recall the South in the sixties, race discrimination and raw hate, as well as recognize her particular...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2011) 38 (3): 119–145.
Published: 01 August 2011
...Christi Ann Merrill This essay offers a response—part plea, part protest—to recent events in Pakistan, looking to Agha Shahid Ali's lyrical translation of an Urdu poem by Faiz Ahmed Faiz that asks compellingly, “Friends, what will happen now?” Faiz in his day ignored Eisenhower's empty talk of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2012) 39 (1): 69–86.
Published: 01 February 2012
... independence, just like March 20, 1956 (Independence Day), or April 9, 1938. This key date will go down not only in the collective Tunisian memory, but also in the memory of the world as a turning point in modern history. Looking at what is happening in Tunisia now, one cannot help but ask how revolutions, or...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2012) 39 (1): 137–165.
Published: 01 February 2012
...Mohamed-Salah Omri The most famous slogan chanted in Tunisia in January, then in Egypt, Yemen, Libya, and Syria, is a reincarnation of opening lines of the poem “The Will of Life,” written in 1933 by the Tunisian poet Abou el-Kasem Chebbi (1909–1934), which now form the closing part of Tunisia’s...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2014) 41 (3): 179–201.
Published: 01 August 2014
...Arne DeBoever This review essay critically assesses Peter Sloterdijk’s book Rage and Time (2006), starting from his more recent book on the welfare state, Die nehmende Hand und die gebende Seite (2010). Both of these texts are part of a by now extensive body of work—rooted in the thought of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2015) 42 (1): 139–152.
Published: 01 February 2015
... experience, as elaborated here, speak in and through every word of his work and as such have formative power for the future because everyday life now is, as the title of this memoir declares, In the Neighborhood of Zero , that is, ever on the verge of extinction. What other critic’s work of the last half...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2015) 42 (3): 23–35.
Published: 01 August 2015
..., which increasingly were seen as distant and abstract manifestations. The response to the historical event was to individualize experience. Survivors were driven to recall the lives they had once known and lived through at the level of the everyday. They were now forced to endure the unanticipated...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2015) 42 (3): 129–141.
Published: 01 August 2015
... this essay. But I also consider another: the emergence of new practices for postmortem care/memorial that relieve social intimates (notably family) of the responsibilities of tending to the dead. In an era where privatization and “self-responsibility” now extend to death, how does sociality get played...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2010) 37 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 February 2010
... trend are discussed by analyzing two key case studies. The first concerns the view of the Roman Catholic Church with regard to the Darwinian theory of evolution (which, surprisingly, seems now less accepted than it used to be in the recent past, in favor of views clearly at odds with the scientific...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2010) 37 (1): 23–55.
Published: 01 February 2010
...Srinivas Aravamudan This essay argues that the university ought to encourage the flourishing of multiple languages and metalanguages. Opposing recent Habermasian universalism and Victorianist virtue talk (e.g., Amanda Anderson's The Way We Argue Now ), it queries why critics turn to character as a...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 5–18.
Published: 01 February 2017
... technologies, through which just about anyone can access technologies of captivation, postproduction, indexation, diffusion, and promotion—technologies that were, until now, industrial functions that were hegemonically controlled by what I have called the psychopower of marketing and the culture industries...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 35–52.
Published: 01 February 2017
... demystification , we know now that we have come to know a new, quite uncultivated philistinism, though believing itself quite cultivated , and rather worse than that of all those bourgeois: a philistinism proper to our own time, a “bobo” philistinism, getting its honey from the buzz. © 2017 by Duke University...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 167–190.
Published: 01 February 2017
... a viable remedy for what Stiegler has astutely diagnosed as the capture of available brain time? Or is it rather more of a throwback to a moment of cultural history (and of the theorization of culture) that has now been superseded, in large part, because of technical advance? © 2017 by Duke...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 239–265.
Published: 01 February 2017
... projection of “light,” which are the hypomnemata , or inscriptions, themselves. The progressivist and utopist styles, and weak messianism, which defined twentieth-century critical projects, themselves fueled the ecocidal trajectory. Any future war over inscriptions, the last perimeters of which bots now...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2018) 45 (1): 253–272.
Published: 01 February 2018
... this post-Catholic crisis. If for over a century the central source of the Irish self was Catholic self-denial, new forms of “Irishness” and selfhood are now emerging, in a very different religious idiom. Two major features of the new spiritualism—the belief in an authentic core of self, and the...