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Published: 01 February 2022
Figure 5 The man with a movie camera in a mug of beer. Man with a Movie Camera Camera (dir. Dziga Vertov, 1929). More
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (3): 151–165.
Published: 01 August 2010
..., Eliot, and Melville. This, in turn, is related to the narrative mobility that makes so striking a feature of both works. © 2010 by Duke University Press 2010 In Global American Studies Imperial Eclecticism in Moby-Dick and Invisible Man: Literature...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (3): 191–220.
Published: 01 August 2012
...Soyica Diggs Colbert “‘When I Die, I Won’t Stay Dead’: The Future of the Human in Suzan-Lori Parks’s The Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World ” puts thing theory in conversation with theorizations of temporality, claiming that things rupture the subject/object binary by dislocating...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2014) 41 (1): 79–100.
Published: 01 February 2014
... (as represented by French theory) was taken up by antihumanist trends, while in communist Eastern Europe it began to unfold under the aegis of “man.” By taking up the threads of this problematic divergence, the essay aims to provide a focusing lens that sharpens but also delimits a vast issue which seems...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 5–19.
Published: 01 May 2003
...Hortense J. Spillers Duke University Press 2003 ‘‘The Little Man at Chehaw Station’’ Today Hortense J. Spillers It would not be an exaggeration to say that I have known something about the ‘‘little man at Chehaw Station’’ virtually...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 195–216.
Published: 01 May 2003
...Jonathan Arac Duke University Press 2003 Toward a Critical Genealogy of the U.S. Discourse of Identity: Invisible Man after Fifty Years Jonathan Arac 1 I start with a key moment late in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2005) 32 (3): 1–20.
Published: 01 August 2005
...Lindsay Waters Lindsay Waters 2005 Is Now the Time for Paul de Man? An Address to Members of the Modern Language Association on the Twentieth Anniversary of Paul de Man’s Death Lindsay Waters And so let us then—by light...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2005) 32 (3): 21–35.
Published: 01 August 2005
...Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak 2005 Learning from de Man: Looking Back Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak I find in the logic of parabasis a descriptive figure of action. This for me is the lesson of de Man. I ask the reader...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2005) 32 (3): 37–41.
Published: 01 August 2005
...Daniel T. O'Hara; Gina Masucci MacKenzie Duke University Press 2005 On the Culture of the Real: A Response to Lindsay Waters’s Critical Reflections on the Case of Paul de Man Daniel T. O’Hara and Gina Masucci MacKenzie Slavoj Žižek remarks in his recent book...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2005) 32 (3): 43–46.
Published: 01 August 2005
...Jim Merod Duke University Press 2005 Lindsay Waters on de Man: On Nothing’s Aftermath Jim Merod Nothing, whether deed, word, thought, or text, ever happens in rela- tion, positive or negative, to anything...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2001) 28 (2): 203–228.
Published: 01 May 2001
... (London: Neville Spear- man, 1955), 34; George Steiner, Language and Silence (New York: Atheneum, 1967), 123; and Elie Wiesel, ‘‘The Holocaust as Literary Inspiration in Dimensions of the Holocaust (Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 1977), 7. Hereafter, subsequent references to Prisms...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 11–30.
Published: 01 May 2009
... Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison and The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow succeeded stylistically and thematically where Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea and William Faulkner's A Fable did not. They offered a new vitality to overcome critics' discourse of the “death of the novel” and probed...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 55–66.
Published: 01 May 2009
... Walt Whitman and his structural echoes of American first-person narratives such as Moby-Dick, The Great Gatsby, All the King's Men , and Invisible Man , Lee troubles the autoethnographic mode that he employs, in common with other important Asian American writings. Lee's work combines imaginative...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 177–198.
Published: 01 May 2009
... entity. Machines preside over—and embody—the ritualistic state of transition to the age of technology. There is a spiritual cost to this material transformation. Apocalyptic imagery permeates the novels' climactic scenes, as the natural order is turned upside down, man falls from the garden, and paradise...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (3): 121–122.
Published: 01 August 2009
...Kenneth Goldsmith Barry Bonds is not only the future of athletics, but he's also emblematic of the future of poetry. More machine than man, chemically enhanced, Bonds is our first mainstream posthuman public figure. Bonds's milestone signifies an end to the humanist discourse; he is a martyr...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (3): 167–177.
Published: 01 August 2010
...Gina M. MacKenzie; Daniel T. O'Hara We read comparatively two acts of self-revision, James's transformation of his 1896 novel The Other House (based on an 1893 dramatic scenario) into a 1909 play and Hitchcock's two film versions of The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934, 1956). Based on Lacanian...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (3): 205–228.
Published: 01 August 2009
... poems, folk songs, letters, and the original lyrics of the “Bed Hangings” sequence—the whole designed to create an elegiac memoir of the poet's mother, Mary Manning Howe, that is also an autobiographical account of the poet's own discovery of her vocation and her place in her maternal family history...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (3): 7–27.
Published: 01 August 2012
... with Jacques Derrida and Paul de Man. This interview was conducted at Gutenberg University in Mainz on May 13, 2011, and was the keynote address of the workshop series “Mapping the World, Mapping Literature: A Global Community of Letters.” I am grateful to Professor Alfred Hornung of Gutenberg University...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2011) 38 (3): 165–215.
Published: 01 August 2011
..., has often been inadequately comprehended and derogated despite evidence to the contrary. From the distance of four decades since his death, Armstrong can be seen as a uniquely self-directed man whose artistic authority and self-confidence were continuously under siege from multiple sources without...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2014) 41 (3): 123–158.
Published: 01 August 2014
... of William Carlos Williams, and his famous essay “The Critic as Host.” He then addresses the reception of his criticism, his thoughts on irony and the work of Paul de Man, the current state of the humanities and humanities education, and the impact of digital technologies on contemporary reading practices...