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lovelessness

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 53–78.
Published: 01 February 2017
....” This essay reconsiders the nature of Duchamp's love affair with art as désamour , or lovelessness, in which work ceases to be work and art is “trans-formed” into “anart.” Duchamp's trajectory from the Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2 of 1912 and the infamous Fountain of 1917, the period Stiegler addresses...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 1–3.
Published: 01 February 2017
...). What has become lost in this history of proletarianization, Stiegler argues, is the figure of the amateur, who loves what he or she does; instead, we have entered into a time of lovelessness, in which everything has become merely “interesting” (Stiegler evokes Hannah Arendt’s figure of the “culti...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 5–18.
Published: 01 February 2017
... toward the consumption of an object. The latter does not include autouniversalization: desire is to the drive what the beautiful is to that which is merely agreeable. We are living in a time of lovelessness (désamour): the time of a libidinal economy that is constituted in such a way...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (1): 199–212.
Published: 01 February 2003
... clever wit in the use of language is usually what gives the song its point, like the cleverness of Patty Loveless’s song that says ‘‘You Can Feel Bad (If It Makes You Feel Better or the old one by Roger Miller in which...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 35–52.
Published: 01 February 2017
... the effects of nihilism into aesthetic and “cultural” domains (thereby producing what Michel Deguy calls “the cultural It arises against the backdrop of the question of lovelessness (désamour) and a decline in the figure of amor, that is to say of the amatore—a decline proceeding from an organological...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (3): 103–132.
Published: 01 August 2020
... into that dependence and need which serve the blind perpetuation of property relations. But the thesis of this paradox leads to destruction, a loveless disregard for things which necessarily turns against people too (39; my emphasis). Today, with the immense heap of commodities having reached heights that Adorno...