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linguistic revolution

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (3): 287–312.
Published: 01 August 2016
..., time and again but always singularly. © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 Marxism Althusser linguistic revolution Hikmet Kıvılcımlı Kemalism The Use-­Value of Idioms: The Language of Marxism and Language...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (3): 221–249.
Published: 01 August 2016
...Leah Feldman Two types of translation dominated the social sphere of the Bolshevik revolution and civil war at the beginning of the twentieth century: the translation of diverse languages in the multilingual empire and a Marxist-Leninist linguistic turn that emphasized the role of dialectical...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (2): 183–213.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Nergis Ertürk This essay traces the legacy of the 1926 Baku Turcological Congress for postcolonial studies and comparative literary criticism. An assembly of 131 delegates, including such prominent figures as the Crimean Tatar Turcologist Bekir Sıdkı Çobanzade, the Kazak revolutionary, linguist...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (2): 75–110.
Published: 01 May 2012
... colonial thinking about the linguistic indigenous was realized in the monumental work, Lin- guistic Survey of India) that parallels the economic indigenous in the Swa- deshi movement in 1905–1908. I think it necessary for the secular critic to wrench the philological-lexicographic revolution from...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (2): 155–185.
Published: 01 May 2010
... the early novelists experienced the “communi- cations revolution” of the period as an uncanny linguistic liberation.24 “Lib- eration,” here, might best be understood not in terms of the historical dis- semination of the French Enlightenment political concepts of freedom and equality, but rather...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (3): 253–286.
Published: 01 August 2016
... words available to name it) was the appari- tional linguistic presence that impeded translation of modern truth.33 Con- sequently, twice in his short life Qu Qiubai felt compelled to agitate for a literary translation revolution. In the early 1920s, he had participated in the literary language...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2023) 50 (2): 133–156.
Published: 01 May 2023
... of resistance or nationalist anti‐eurocentrism. Though their work is little known except to scholars in Slavic Studies, in the years following the Russian Revolution of 1917 Soviet Orientologists laid the foundations for the critique of Western Orientalism that would be introduced to the West many years later...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2023) 50 (1): 69–104.
Published: 01 February 2023
... Russian) supremacy draws its geopoetic fantasy from an interdisciplinary body of ethnolinguistic and geographical discourses of Eurasian cultural, territorial, and economic totality. 9 While not irreducible to a linguistic model, universalist linguistics played a pivotal role in shaping...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2002) 29 (3): 91–103.
Published: 01 August 2002
... I propose to approach the theme of the literature of the Cuban dias- pora from the perspective of a literary critic committed to the cultural project of the Revolution. I will do so by means of a glossary that, starting...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (2): 71–74.
Published: 01 May 2012
... revolution and the emergence of world literature, and situates a number of studies in the dossier as concerned with this link. Finally, it presents Erich Auerbach and Edward Said as contributors to a potential radicalization of the philology of world literature, replacing its organicist-nationalist...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2011) 38 (2): 67–123.
Published: 01 May 2011
... into an advocate for radi- cal linguistic and literary revolution? This essay has already provided sev- eral clues. First, both archaic prose and the vernacular saw classical Chi- nese and the system in which it was embedded as the opposition. Second, both those who advocated archaic prose and those...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2002) 29 (1): 153–176.
Published: 01 February 2002
... paradigm, the significance of which had yet to be fully compre- hended and recognized at the time of its publication. Despite its linguistic archaism, this essay bears some of the features of modern critical writing as we know it. Although we are not concerned here with his readings of the novel, some...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2008) 35 (3): 99–131.
Published: 01 August 2008
... and unemployable to the bottom of the social and economic pyramid, and perpetual warfare on national and global fronts. Antonio Gramsci's analysis of “passive revolution” seems cogent for this moment, particularly for the ways media and other cultural forms play a significant role in mobilizing or disorganizing...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2011) 38 (2): 235–237.
Published: 01 May 2011
... ­wolfgangfritzhaug.inkrit.de. Ruth Y. Y. Hung is assistant professor of comparative literature at Hong Kong Baptist University. Hung has published on the Chinese critical intellectual Hu Feng and on the genre of Chinese memoir writing in Eng­lish since the Cultural Revolution. Cur- rently, she is completing two books...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2001) 28 (3): 19–60.
Published: 01 August 2001
... of ordering knowledge or understanding, the new paradigm represented by the linguistic turn sug- gests most prominently a disordering, or even the impossibility, of historical knowledge. This is the way White’s ‘‘revolution’’ in historiography appears to Iggers, another distinguished historiographer. What...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (1): 23–55.
Published: 01 February 2010
... credentialization—on the basis of greater or lesser conformity with proceduralist hegemony legislated as universal good manners—is destined to fail, as it draws boundaries around character attributes that function as substitutes for language itself, spawn- ing the multiple problems of theoretical, linguistic...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2014) 41 (1): 79–100.
Published: 01 February 2014
... in Miglena Nikolchina, Lost Unicorns of the Velvet Revolutions: Heterotopias of the Seminar (New York: Fordham University Press, 2012), in the chapter “Аn Unfinished Project: Man as Comedy,” 88–108, which also deals with Mamardash- vili’s views on the human. See also my “The Concave Mirror: Notes...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2022) 49 (2): 193–211.
Published: 01 May 2022
... is not a separate line but an organic part of the narrative. Throughout, Grafton and Bell's writing is as clear as a textbook requires, without sacrificing the subjective voice that evades the bland illusion of omniscience. Grafton and Bell manage to be cosmopolitan, crossing any number of linguistic and other...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2021) 48 (1): 17–34.
Published: 01 February 2021
... linguistics before Chomsky, even during Leonard Bloomfield s generation. Chomsky did not set out to dismantle it, yet a diminishment of the importance of field work is very much one of the effects the Chomskyan revolution in linguistics had, especially in its first decades (Harris 1995). However, in part...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2004) 31 (1): 207–241.
Published: 01 February 2004
... other Western European economies were dramatically transformed in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by the first and second industrial revolutions, most of Ireland remained non- industrialized, and its economy continued to be, until very recently, unusu- ally dependent for a Western...