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libidinal economy

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 167–190.
Published: 01 February 2017
.../operation of desire and the theorization of technics in terms of the libidinal economy that it undergirds (as presented, for example, in the three lectures that are published in this special issue), the fundamental question will be the following: Does the endorsement of desire and libidinal economy provide...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 5–18.
Published: 01 February 2017
... economy of drives, that is to say, a libidinal diseconomy . © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 machinic turn of sensibility proletarianization consumer amateur libidinal economy Reference Arasse Daniel . 2006 . Histoires de peintures . Paris : Folio . The...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 53–78.
Published: 01 February 2017
... diseconomy. (Stiegler, “Proletarianization,” 7)14 Duchamp’s devil’s bargain with indifference, delay, and désamour, within the context of Stiegler’s reinscription of the amateur, is a function of what Stiegler calls the disrupted, transformed libidinal economy—the déséconomie libidinale...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 79–105.
Published: 01 February 2017
... proletarianization of sensibility, which belongs to this last form of proletarianization. I attempt to contextualize this new work in relation to Stiegler's past work on political economy, as well as some of his political positions about capitalism as a social organization. I explain where the notion of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2015) 42 (2): 85–104.
Published: 01 May 2015
.... Stiegler explores, beyond its usual and derogatory definitions, consump- tion as a second stage of proletarianization that is underwritten by a libidi- nal economy. While Jean-­François Lyotard, in The Postmodern Condition, opens this question of a consumerist libidinal (dis)economy, Stiegler takes...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 35–52.
Published: 01 February 2017
... is a translation of ambiguities that are themselves decomposing and that are rotting the process of transindividuation, at a time when the libidinal economy (whose psychosocial reality is this process) is already on the brink of ruin. The ordeal of philistinism appears as a hallmark of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 19–34.
Published: 01 February 2017
... constituted by technicity: it supports a libidinal economy whose consistencies are the objects reflectively projected on the plane of the extra-­ordinary by ordinary objects and onto these objects themselves. This economy is essentially what constitutes the desiring (that is reflecting, suprasensible...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 125–147.
Published: 01 February 2017
... . “Bernard Stiegler: A Rational Theory of Miracles; On Pharmacology and Transindividuation.” Interview by Roberts Ben Gilbert Jeremy Hayward Mark , translated by Roberts Ben . New Formations 77 : 164 – 84 . ———. 2012b . “Interview: From Libidinal Economy to the Ecology of the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2016) 43 (1): 43–74.
Published: 01 February 2016
... and crowds is libidinal, a relational framework applicable and adaptable to encounters from personal fantasy (being in love) to impersonal mass (constituents of a political rally).3 Curiously enough, Adorno’s text on group psychology and fascism4 makes no mention of that particular group about...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 191–212.
Published: 01 February 2017
... human bodies have been de- and refunctionalized by technics, their energies differently harnessed and (“libidinally”) invested in the construc- tion of societies. From the slower, more patient expectations of cultures in which letter writing and low-­intensity farming predominate to our con...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2017) 44 (1): 213–237.
Published: 01 February 2017
... vector of a new libidinal economy, of unprecendented processes of sublimation, and of the invention of a new age of otium—an otium of the people. (Stiegler 2013c: 49) Consciousness as such in its living present can only be present to itself by way of an object that allows for...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2010) 37 (2): 217–225.
Published: 01 May 2010
...) “history can sometimes only appear as trace, as mood and affect—the very things pop is more apt to capture than the grain of quotidian life amid great upheavals, or the subtleties and grandeurs of history writ large.”3 Confronting Greater Los Angeles as a global megalopolis of libidinal...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2014) 41 (1): 101–112.
Published: 01 February 2014
... in worldly asceticism and frugality. Karl Marx gave production the primary role in economy: what constitutes the value of the commodity, and what makes it exchangeable in the market, for him, is the socially necessary labor time. And the neopuri- tan ethic of the Bolsheviks radicalized...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2007) 34 (1): 115–133.
Published: 01 February 2007
... trans-frontera borderlands but ahead, linking city and country in a space-time globalized maze of libidinal interface. It is not enough to figure these modes of cul- tural production in Asia or on the Rim as perpetual latecomers, late-modern derivatives, or bastardized mixtures in any sense...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 November 2016) 43 (4): 71–125.
Published: 01 November 2016
... commentators have taken him as producing. 11. Fredric Jameson, “Towards a Libidinal Economy of Three Modern Painters” (1979), in his The Modernist Papers (London: Verso, 2007), 258. 12. John Rewald, ed., Paul Cézanne Letters (Oxford: Bruno Cassirer, 1941), 8. Smith / Cézanne...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2001) 28 (2): 13–19.
Published: 01 May 2001
..., Selected Letters, 45; my emphasis. 10. Quoted in P. N. Furbank, E. M. Forster: A Life (London: Secker and Warburg, 1978), 2:56. 234 boundary 2 / Summer 2001 jects 11 While its underlying sadomasochistic narrative seems to support what Slavoj Žižek has theorized as the play of the ‘‘libidinal...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2001) 28 (2): 229–258.
Published: 01 May 2001
..., Selected Letters, 45; my emphasis. 10. Quoted in P. N. Furbank, E. M. Forster: A Life (London: Secker and Warburg, 1978), 2:56. 234 boundary 2 / Summer 2001 jects 11 While its underlying sadomasochistic narrative seems to support what Slavoj Žižek has theorized as the play of the ‘‘libidinal...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2004) 31 (1): 207–241.
Published: 01 February 2004
... from the early modern period until the late twentieth century. Whereas other Western European economies were dramatically transformed in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by the first and second industrial revolutions, most of Ireland remained non- industrialized, and its economy...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2009) 36 (2): 67–97.
Published: 01 May 2009
..., depending on whom you ask, we beat up the doughboy; sometimes, instead, the Michelin Man beats us. Surowiecki’s claims seem less interesting to me as the description of a sociological fact—the rise of more savvy consumers in postindustrial economies—than as a prescription for how to properly...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2006) 33 (1): 61–76.
Published: 01 February 2006
.... All volumes are now in paperback. The titles of the individual volumes are: Fundamentalisms Observed, vol. 1; Fundamentalisms and Society: Reclaiming the Sciences, the Family, and Education, vol. 2; Fundamentalisms and the State: Remaking Polities, Economies, and Militance, vol. 3; Accounting for...