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libidinal economy

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 167–190.
Published: 01 February 2017
.../operation of desire and the theorization of technics in terms of the libidinal economy that it undergirds (as presented, for example, in the three lectures that are published in this special issue), the fundamental question will be the following: Does the endorsement of desire and libidinal economy provide...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2019) 46 (4): 1–29.
Published: 01 November 2019
... of consent force on individuals. Rand’s penchant for imagining a literally libidinal economy hardly defines the tastes of conservatism tout court . Nevertheless, the masochistic erotic formations in her novels constitute a defining feature of an ideology that views government as a pain. © 2019 by Duke...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 5–18.
Published: 01 February 2017
... machinic turn of sensibility—which is no longer analog but digital—leads to a renaissance of the figure of the amateur, that is to say, to a reconstitution of libidinal energy which, after being systematically canalized and rerouted by consumerist organization, ends up putting in place an economy of drives...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2015) 42 (2): 85–104.
Published: 01 May 2015
... and derogatory definitions, consump- tion as a second stage of proletarianization that is underwritten by a libidi- nal economy. While Jean-­François Lyotard, in The Postmodern Condition, opens this question of a consumerist libidinal (dis)economy, Stiegler takes issue with its reliance on a leisure...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 53–78.
Published: 01 February 2017
... calls the disrupted, transformed libidinal economy—the déséconomie libidinale. Indeed, all of Stiegler’s work can be seen as an 13. I mean sign in the most generic sense. Glyn Thompson (2012) explores the more com- plex esoteric terminology through which Duchamp works. 14. Stiegler’s talks lay...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 35–52.
Published: 01 February 2017
... that are themselves decomposing and that are rotting the process of transindividuation, at a time when the libidinal economy (whose psychosocial reality is this process) is already on the brink of ruin. The ordeal of philistinism appears as a hallmark of our times and as our lot. It translates...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 125–147.
Published: 01 February 2017
... of Miracles; On Pharmacology and Transindividuation.” Interview by Roberts Ben Gilbert Jeremy Hayward Mark , translated by Roberts Ben . New Formations 77 : 164 – 84 . ———. 2012b . “Interview: From Libidinal Economy to the Ecology of the Spirit.” Translated by De Boever...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 19–34.
Published: 01 February 2017
... because the object of desire is constituted by technicity: it supports a libidinal economy whose consistencies are the objects reflectively projected on the plane of the extra-­ordinary by ordinary objects and onto these objects themselves. This economy is essentially what constitutes the desiring...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 213–237.
Published: 01 February 2017
...- ary redoubling can be thought only as the object of an economico-­ political struggle in regard to the relation to instruments of negotium, and such that it can become the vector of a new libidinal economy, of unprecendented processes of sublimation, and of the invention...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 191–212.
Published: 01 February 2017
... his largely psychoanalytical account of the libidinal economy of desire. Evolutionary biologists are routinely criticized for reducing aesthet- ics to biology (e.g., Armstrong 2013: preface), and, in a similar vein, it has been suggested that Stiegler collapses aesthetics into technics...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (1): 43–74.
Published: 01 February 2016
... that characterizes the political character of a group but the intentionality preceding that bond’s having been convened. This acknowledges, as Freud’s earlier text does with far more radical ambi- guity, that the mechanism of bonding in the formation of groups and crowds is libidinal, a relational framework...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (2): 217–225.
Published: 01 May 2010
... only appear as trace, as mood and affect—the very things pop is more apt to capture than the grain of quotidian life amid great upheavals, or the subtleties and grandeurs of history writ large.”3 Confronting Greater Los Angeles as a global megalopolis of libidinal excess...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2007) 34 (1): 115–133.
Published: 01 February 2007
... borderlands but ahead, linking city and country in a space-time globalized maze of libidinal interface. It is not enough to figure these modes of cul- tural production in Asia or on the Rim as perpetual latecomers, late-modern derivatives, or bastardized mixtures in any sense. This booming and bus...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 79–105.
Published: 01 February 2017
... to the proletarianization of sensibility, which belongs to this last form of proletarianization. I attempt to contextualize this new work in relation to Stiegler's past work on political economy, as well as some of his political positions about capitalism as a social organization. I explain where the notion...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2014) 41 (1): 101–112.
Published: 01 February 2014
... in worldly asceticism and frugality. Karl Marx gave production the primary role in economy: what constitutes the value of the commodity, and what makes it exchangeable in the market, for him, is the socially necessary labor time. And the neopuri- tan ethic of the Bolsheviks radicalized productivism...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2001) 28 (2): 13–19.
Published: 01 May 2001
... emphasis. 10. Quoted in P. N. Furbank, E. M. Forster: A Life (London: Secker and Warburg, 1978), 2:56. 234 boundary 2 / Summer 2001 jects 11 While its underlying sadomasochistic narrative seems to support what Slavoj Žižek has theorized as the play of the ‘‘libidinal economy of sur- plus enjoyment...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2001) 28 (2): 229–258.
Published: 01 May 2001
... emphasis. 10. Quoted in P. N. Furbank, E. M. Forster: A Life (London: Secker and Warburg, 1978), 2:56. 234 boundary 2 / Summer 2001 jects 11 While its underlying sadomasochistic narrative seems to support what Slavoj Žižek has theorized as the play of the ‘‘libidinal economy of sur- plus enjoyment...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2022) 49 (1): 105–135.
Published: 01 February 2022
... it with other modes of apprehending temporality. In so doing, it remains an independent medium that functions as the script of the libidinal economy of postcolonial India. My deepest thanks to Dan Morgan, Gerard Siarny, and Dipesh Chakrabarty for their careful reading and critical suggestions on multiple...
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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2004) 31 (1): 207–241.
Published: 01 February 2004
... other Western European economies were dramatically transformed in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by the first and second industrial revolutions, most of Ireland remained non- industrialized, and its economy continued to be, until very recently, unusu- ally dependent for a Western...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2021) 48 (2): 233–247.
Published: 01 May 2021
... capitalism” (83, 84). What this erstwhile apolitical trolling allows for, I would further suggest, is the cultivation of a mass libidinal attachment to the cruel pleasure of performing one's refusal of liberal pieties. As Burley continues, the trollish misogyny of channers is placed in relation to men's...