1-20 of 243 Search Results for

invisible

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (3): 151–165.
Published: 01 August 2010
..., Eliot, and Melville. This, in turn, is related to the narrative mobility that makes so striking a feature of both works. © 2010 by Duke University Press 2010 In Global American Studies Imperial Eclecticism in Moby-Dick and Invisible Man: Literature...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 21–45.
Published: 01 May 2003
...Kevin Bell Duke University Press 2003 The Embrace of Entropy: Ralph Ellison and the Freedom Principle of Jazz Invisible Kevin Bell For Lee Morgan and John Gilmore 1. Space Music...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 195–216.
Published: 01 May 2003
...Jonathan Arac Duke University Press 2003 Toward a Critical Genealogy of the U.S. Discourse of Identity: Invisible Man after Fifty Years Jonathan Arac 1 I start with a key moment late in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 11–30.
Published: 01 May 2009
... Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison and The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow succeeded stylistically and thematically where Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea and William Faulkner's A Fable did not. They offered a new vitality to overcome critics' discourse of the “death of the novel” and probed...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 55–66.
Published: 01 May 2009
... Walt Whitman and his structural echoes of American first-person narratives such as Moby-Dick, The Great Gatsby, All the King's Men , and Invisible Man , Lee troubles the autoethnographic mode that he employs, in common with other important Asian American writings. Lee's work combines imaginative...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 199–208.
Published: 01 May 2009
... bring to light something too often invisible in today's world: the imbrication of America with Russia, of London with Indiana, of Iraq with Chechnya at the level of shared violence. Shared, that is, in the most intimate sense of the body, not some abstractly conceptual “global village.” When we fail...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (4): 33–55.
Published: 01 November 2017
... in the societies in question. In liberal-democratic societies, violence is often present in sublimated forms, not involving direct physical damage. That such situations of invisible violence often become the source of further violence requires an analysis of the militaristic manipulation of feelings of anxiety...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (2): 95–125.
Published: 01 May 2017
... of the dynamics of revolutionary events themselves. The essay responds to political-theoretical discourse positing the “invisibility” of politics and the People. Its central claim is that film, but also more broadly audiovisual media in all their current proliferation, can have a revolutionary function...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (2): 241–256.
Published: 01 May 2017
...Richard Purcell In “Did the Digital Age Kill the Literary Star?” Richard Purcell looks back on Adam Bradley's Ralph Ellison in Progress: From “Invisible Man” to “Three Days before the Shooting” in light of Edward Snowden's revelations that the White House and the National Security Agency have been...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (2): 181–198.
Published: 01 May 2020
... and garners its effects from the division between value and disregard, things and persons, human and nonhuman. In analyzing how legal reasoning has historically contributed to literal expropriation, I examine the generally invisible nexus of animality, human marginalization, and juridical authority. boundary...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (3): 193–200.
Published: 01 August 2020
... and the subsequent invasion and occupation of Afghanistan by a US-led coalition. The author also recounts the hidden history surrounding the first known drone attack in Afghanistan and the larger question of drone violence, which has remained invisible to mainstream audiences. © 2020 Duke University Press 2020...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 97–114.
Published: 01 May 2003
.... These reflections will be preceded by a discussion of how sound recording and reproduction figure in twentieth-century black culture, followed by an analysis of the prologue of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, in which I examine the way he imagines a sub- ject of ‘‘sonic Afro-modernity Ellison constructs a model...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 157–174.
Published: 01 May 2003
... to the events of the late 1950s. They also reflected some of the concerns that had shaped the writing of Invisible Man (1952) and remained the focus of his essays and interviews in the years following the publication of his novel. In his writings, Ellison continuously probed the nature of American and Negro...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 175–194.
Published: 01 May 2003
...John S. Wright Duke University Press 2003 ‘‘Jack-the-Bear’’ Dreaming: Ellison’s Spiritual Technologies John S. Wright The year following the 1952 publication of Invisible Man, at the pre- sentation ceremony for the National...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 115–136.
Published: 01 May 2003
...? (Invisible Man asks, ‘‘Could this com- pulsion to put invisibility down in black and white be thus an urge to make music of invisibility3 I choose Ellison as a critical guide because before becoming a writer, and indeed even in his first years of trying to write fiction, the future author of Invisible Man...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (3): 169–189.
Published: 01 August 2012
... manu- script, returns us to the earliest days of Ellison’s never to be completed novel in progress. The five words composing their title begin “And Hickman Arrives,” the first material Ellison published from his then untitled follow up to Invisible Man.1 By the time Hickman arrived on the pages...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 47–64.
Published: 01 May 2003
... refer to Ellison’s well-known championing of black folklore and leave it at that? After the work of Robert O’Meally, it is incontestable that ‘‘Invisible Man is built on folk foundations Why attempt to link this with the tradition of minstrelsy? I will argue that Ellison’s ambitions for black...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2024) 51 (1): 143–178.
Published: 01 February 2024
... depth—and there's nothing whatsoever to be seen in it.” (Benjamin 2003a : 109–10) In the same essay, Spillers ( 1988a ) glosses her chapter discussing how Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man mobilizes myth in relation to the filing of Afro-American letters under the disciplinary umbrella of sociology...
FIGURES
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 65–96.
Published: 01 May 2003
... the contours of Invisible Man in 1945, Burke’s literary theory had become such an intimate aspect of his imagination that, as Lawrence Jackson observes, Burke’s formulations played an indispensable role in the manuscript’s composition. Ellison’s method, as Jackson explains it, ‘‘was to outline the movement...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2003) 30 (2): 5–19.
Published: 01 May 2003
... that invisible man ‘‘loves’’ and ‘‘hates’’ at the same time. Confronting, then, the bare blues of the American symphony, Ellison is flexed between what is and what might be, fundamentally wed to the notion that ‘‘one fine morn- ingthough it will likely fructify no time soon. Before rereading the essay...