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human/animal

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (3): 97–103.
Published: 01 August 2009
...Jonathan Skinner For William Carlos Williams, poetry was a war machine, a “small (or large) machine made of words.” If the war is a human war on other species, do poetry machines become poetry animals? Can we read Christopher Dewdney's “Permugenesis,” Marianne Moore's “An Octopus,” or Francis...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (2): 133–153.
Published: 01 May 2010
... subfield of media hauntology are still too anthropocentric, given the continued investment in human exceptionalism (albeit of an abject kind). Rather, the cybernetic interdependence of humans, animals, and machines should be fully acknowledged and appreciated in order to avoid the conflation of pathos with...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (2): 119–151.
Published: 01 May 2020
... human-being through a consideration of human animality beyond the traditional divide between nature and culture. Copyright © 2020 Duke University Press 2020 humanism human-being human/animal history species References Benjamin Walter . 1996 . One-Way Street. In Selected...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (4): 63–99.
Published: 01 November 2020
... further understanding of these novels and their wider bearing on human-animal relations. Building from the classical distinction between bios and zoē (political and “bare life”) described by Giorgio Agamben, this essay theorizes an occluded flesh that is violently excluded from discourse: xenoflesh...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (1): 191–212.
Published: 01 February 2017
... paleoanthropologist André Leroi-Gourhan, Stiegler argues that humans evolve biologically insofar as they are animals, but they become human only through technics. Through tools, we are able to take hold of our own future by reconstructing environments to which we are maladapted and by preserving values that we choose...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (4): 1–24.
Published: 01 November 2020
.... Lilly’s work sits at the crossroads of many vectors in postwar American culture: the birth of the counterculture from the spirit of Cold War militarized science; the cybernetic dream of flattening the differences between animal, human, machine, and alien intelligence; the exploration of otherness through...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (2): 181–198.
Published: 01 May 2020
... meaning and garners its effects from the division between value and disregard, things and persons, human and nonhuman. In analyzing how legal reasoning has historically contributed to literal expropriation, I examine the generally invisible nexus of animality, human marginalization, and juridical...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2015) 42 (3): 1–17.
Published: 01 August 2015
... modernity” renounce the most fundamental assumptions of modernity as we have known it—from universalism, democracy, human rights, secularism, equal rights for all regardless of race, class, gender, religious affinity, and so on, all the way to its temporalities and spatialities—as Eurocentric impositions on...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (2): 1–68.
Published: 01 May 2010
... scholars but from those interested in issues of Enlightenment and national culture, literature and late capitalism, and in the nature of critical intervention in the modern humanities more generally. © 2010 by Duke University Press 2010 Dark Fields of the Republic: Seamus Deane’s Sundered Provinces...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2002) 29 (1): 223–257.
Published: 01 February 2002
... ‘‘animal’’ and the animalistic, which in turn makes pos- sible a symbolic economy in which we can engage in a ‘‘non-criminal putting to death’’ (as Derrida puts it) of other humans as well by marking them as animal.8 That the foundational humanist dichotomy of human/animal is an essentially...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (3): 59–72.
Published: 01 August 2017
... engage our feelings without appropriation? Can we think through human and non- human mutuality without abstracting animals into what can be packaged and consumed—either as objects of moral concern or as literary device? In disavowing any cherished humanism, William Carlos Williams writes...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (1): 143–172.
Published: 01 February 2016
... itself. Shaviro’s notion of a wasp experiencing beauty cannot be mere poetic license, for its implications are large. They are so because affect theory, when it is not busy divorcing agency and meaning from animal experience and thus nar- rowing semiosis toward the human (a stance of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (1): 107–141.
Published: 01 February 2016
... paradigms of musical disciplines point to a shifting conceptual ground of the acoustic in the humanities. And the musical disciplines are not alone. As Eduardo Viveiros de Castro remarks, the present moment is one in which “the terrifying communication of the geopolitical and the geophysi- cal...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (1): 137–153.
Published: 01 February 2013
.... While I think this argument has merit—and in fact a great deal of historical accuracy—it is ultimately shortsighted and indeed compromised by its unwillingness to consider the essential animating force of what has been called “secularization”: namely, the desire of (some) human beings to relieve...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (1): 231–232.
Published: 01 February 2012
..., 2011. Halberstam, Judith. The Queer Art of Failure. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011. Hames- García, Michael. Identity Complex: Making the Case for Multiplicity. Minne- apolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2011. Hesford, Wendy S. Spectacular Rhetorics: Human Rights Visions...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (2): 263–264.
Published: 01 May 2020
... Copyright © 2020 Duke University Press 2020 boundary 2 47:2 (2020) DOI 10.1215/01903659-8260197 © 2020 by Duke University Press Contributors Jonathan Arac serves as Mellon Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh, where he founded the Humanities Center in 2008 and directed it...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2015) 42 (4): 62–72.
Published: 01 November 2015
... line of boys and girls closely hoping she might get a glimpse of her children And the beige man says: the Guatemalans are here for the animals, to kill them, to dissect them, to eat the parts of them that are too rancid for the rest of humanity The authoritative beige man has taken the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (2): 239–241.
Published: 01 May 2013
... Modernism and the Politics of Popular Culture. New York: Fordham University Press, 2012. Weigel, Sigrid. Walter Benjamin: Images, the Creaturely, and the Holy. Trans. Chad- wick Truscott Smith. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013. Wolfe, Cary. Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (4): 25–61.
Published: 01 November 2020
... allegorizes that is, the universal power-hungry desire it summons as the basis of its human/animal mythology, which characteristically erases the animal altogether as such. My contention is that when opened to allegorical appropriations, Jiang s conception of wolf power overcomes ideological and political...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (3): 91–99.
Published: 01 August 2010
... the reason championed by the Enlightenment reflects not just an errant will to power but is also a defen- sive response to human suffering. If reason is animated by a need to con- trol and subdue nature, this is because nature itself has posed a threat to human survival. It is not surprising...