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historical fiction

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2011) 38 (3): 27–65.
Published: 01 August 2011
... article argues that what brings these authors together is a unique understanding of democracy as the defining trait of modernity. This translates into a democratic pragmatics, in which moral norms and historical laws are fractured and questioned, leaving an “empty place” (Claude Lefort) at the center of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2007) 34 (2): 1–20.
Published: 01 May 2007
... a very different American literature from that of Twain.16 Eventually, this inquiry will require further thinking about genre forms for historical fiction, keeping in mind that in Life on the Mis- sissippi (1883) Twain attacked Scott as savagely as he later did Cooper. Huckleberry...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (2): 215–238.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Manisha Basu This essay reads exemplary instances of the fictional work of Indian novelist R. K. Narayan (1906-2001) as expressions of critical anachronism in a world literary marketplace that, despite claiming diversity as a global, even transcendental, value, remains committed to both the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (1): 173–199.
Published: 01 February 2020
... novel with formal and affective possibilities that becomes all the more significant because of its loss in the second half of the twentieth century. Copyright © 2020 Duke University Press 2020 Li Jieren modern Chinese novel historical fiction gazetteer narrative Chinese Revolution of 1911...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2014) 41 (3): 55–91.
Published: 01 August 2014
..., historical process of the erasure of history itself, culminating in a disruption or blockage of critical thinking, in which particular fictions (the “war on terror,” for example), through repeated and widespread use in our major institutions (schools, media, government, and political parties), substitute...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (4): 25–61.
Published: 01 November 2020
... this book as a work of fiction having its specific historical place and functions, including its functions extended through allegory. I ask how, in seizing on a popular trope, some power discourses intertwine to provide ulterior meanings where conflicts of meaning and controversies set in. I reveal...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 11–30.
Published: 01 May 2009
...Mark Greif The category of the “big, ambitious novel,” circumscribing works by authors such as Thomas Pynchon, William Gaddis, David Foster Wallace, and William Vollmann, has come to constitute one of the major forms through which postwar U.S. fiction is sorted and evaluated. A history of this form...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (2): 25–39.
Published: 01 May 2013
...Jesse Rosenthal Action is traditionally the point at which formal and ethical readings of fiction intersect. To act is to be “heroic,” at once in the formal sense of being a main character and in the ethical sense of being a hero. This essay argues, though, that this formal-ethical emphasis on...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (2): 29–48.
Published: 01 May 2020
...Daniel T. O’Hara The large historical transformation from a culture of work and achievement to one of consumption and pleasure, in progressively extreme and democratically available forms, finds its expression in the finest details of fictional, literary artistry. Thomas Mann’s development of the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (3): 85–101.
Published: 01 August 2020
...Yahya Elsaghe; Sina Rahmani; Yahya Elsaghe Why does W. G. Sebald’s Austerlitz escape from the laws of fictionality and factuality? How do so many of the people and place names inside of it start so improbably with the letter A ? Why do so many iterations of A —as initials, as markings, or as...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2015) 42 (1): 67–85.
Published: 01 February 2015
...Sergio Villalobos-Ruminott From the beginning, the work of William V. Spanos has been characterized by a secular vocation, the confrontation with historical relations of power and subordination. His writings on American literature, contemporary humanities, and the Harvard Red Book, along with his...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2009) 36 (2): 31–54.
Published: 01 May 2009
... between the public and the private in the contemporary United States. Franzen reflects on the challenges that this situation of cultural entropy poses to the novelist, and on the capacity of the novel to respond to or affect this situation. Recognizing and rejecting the temptation in fiction to convey...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (3): 59–86.
Published: 01 August 2013
...Lee Konstantinou This essay investigates the common charge that contemporary US fiction and the literature of 9/11 have failed to meaningfully engage with the world. While it is true that American fiction has become increasingly insular and that the New York City-based publishing industry...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2018) 45 (4): 127–159.
Published: 01 November 2018
...Baidik Bhattacharya This essay identifies and explores a new paradigm of imperial crime management (and eventually of colonial governance more broadly) in the second half of the nineteenth century that emerged at the cusp of criminal anthropology, imperial culture, and fiction. I call this new...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2014) 41 (2): 99–111.
Published: 01 May 2014
... another, as a ubiquitous electronic background activity, change their experience of interacting with the printed word? Gumbrecht bases his observations on two seminars that he taught in Santiago de Chile in 2013, in which Stanford undergraduates were reading fiction and nonfiction texts in both English...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2014) 41 (1): 153–170.
Published: 01 February 2014
.... For Russia’s hyperextractive state, the population is superfluous. Introducing the concept of magical historicism, the essay aims at an intrinsic analysis of cultural change. It uses fictional texts, such as Dmitry Bykov’s and Vladimir Sorokin’s recent novels, to explore political, gender, and...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (2): 53–79.
Published: 01 May 2013
... for expanding the realist novel’s scope? Do immigrant novels? And could the realist novel still learn from the genres against which it typically defines itself? Can it learn from science fiction novels, which, after all, have an easier time than most talking about planets? © 2013 by Duke University...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2017) 44 (2): 241–256.
Published: 01 May 2017
... secretly collecting metadata on private citizens. The essay asks what Bradley's book and Ellison's fiction have to say about the role of the critic and literature when faced with the undemocratic forces of technology and progress. Book Reviewed: Bradley Adam , Ralph Ellison in Progress: From...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2016) 43 (2): 163–178.
Published: 01 May 2016
... contemporary fiction and TV. She also discusses her career, beginning as a New Historicist, and her current project constructing a print-and-web anthology of American Literature in the World . © 2016 by Duke University Press 2016 Wai Chee Dimock American literature global literature New Historicism...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (3): 61–83.
Published: 01 August 2020
... voice, which speaks to us out of a clearly demarcated yet unlocatable place. The result is not a troubling of the boundary between the real and the fictional, as many of his critics have contended, but a reflection on how the past continues to shape the present, forming the real and imaginative...