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gothic

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (2004) 31 (1): 25–47.
Published: 01 February 2004
...Luke Gibbons Duke University Press 2004 Ireland, America, and Gothic Memory: Transatlantic Terror in the Early Republic Luke Gibbons For a people who made much of their ‘‘newnesstheir potential, freedom, and innocence—it...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2007) 34 (3): 87–107.
Published: 01 August 2007
...Victoria Nelson Duke University Press 2007 Faux Catholic: A Gothic Subgenre from Monk Lewis to Dan Brown Victoria Nelson “God is dead. Meet the kids.” —Neil Gaiman, The Anansi Boys We’ve seen it on the big...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2004) 31 (1): 49–71.
Published: 01 February 2004
...Siobhán Kilfeather Duke University Press 2004 Terrific Register: The Gothicization of Atrocity in Irish Romanticism Siobhán Kilfeather Where there is leisure for fiction, there is little grief. —Samuel Johnson, Lives of the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2014) 41 (3): 1–25.
Published: 01 August 2014
... establishment in modeling a national response to 9/11, and that might have worked against the reification of a unitary terror as the exclusive property of the enemy-other. English novels of the 1790s (Gothic novels) and the 1890s (Marsh, The Beetle ) offer a comparatively flexible language for registering the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (3): 101–122.
Published: 01 August 2010
... on annihilation by fire, it offers a speculative connection between the hazards of circumstance (or accidents external to the archive) and a proto-gothic pulsion toward auto-immolation within the archive proper. The essay concludes with a lengthy reading of Henry James's The Aspern Papers and the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2007) 34 (3): 211–213.
Published: 01 August 2007
...- ton and editor of Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary History. His most recent book is The Gothic Text. Forthcoming are “The Tooth that Nibbles at the Soul”: Essays on Poetry and Music and, later, The True and the Interesting in Nineteenth-Century Fiction. He has held...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2000) 27 (2): 213–215.
Published: 01 May 2000
... the Culture of Gothic. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1999. Elfenbein, Andrew. Romantic Genius: The Prehistory of a Homosexual Role. Be- 6084 boundary 2 27:2 / sheet 222 of 227 tween Men—Between Women. New York: Columbia...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2002) 29 (2): 181–184.
Published: 01 May 2002
...: Palgrave, 2001. Matz, Jesse. Literary Impressionism and Modernist Aesthetics. Cambridge: Cam- bridge University Press, 2001. Meyers, Helene. Femicidal Fears: Narratives of the Female Gothic Experience.New York: State University of New York Press, 2001. Miller, J. Hillis. Speech Acts in Literature...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2004) 31 (1): 271–272.
Published: 01 February 2004
... (2002), and ‘‘The Theatre of Irish Cinema a special issue of the Yale Journal of Criticism (2002), and is a contributing editor of the landmark Field Day Anthology of Irish Writ- ing (1991). His Gaelic Gothic: Race, Colonialism, and Irish Culture will be published in 2004. Siobhán Kilfeather is...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2002) 29 (1): 289–293.
Published: 01 February 2002
... Irony. Princeton, N.J., and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2001. Smith, Andrew, and Jeff Wallace, eds. Gothic Modernisms. New York: Palgrave, 2001. Smith, M. W. Reading Simulacra: Fatal Theories for Postmodernity. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001. Smith, Sidonie. Moving Lives...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2013) 40 (2): 1–8.
Published: 01 May 2013
... offi- cial argument, which asserts a principle of universal benevolence, and the example’s reluctant affirmation that deep down we are indifferent to any- thing but our self-­interest. What’s most literary here is not the trappings of Gothic horror but the pleasure (itself a component of Gothic...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2004) 31 (2): 197–218.
Published: 01 May 2004
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2001) 28 (3): 191–205.
Published: 01 August 2001
... decode an image. Students who read books not assigned for courses undergo ques- tioning from their friends about this odd habit. The Gothic buildings some- times seem to be inhabited by real Goths. And not many of the eager con- versations and sharp exchanges in which mentors and pupils engaged from...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2000) 27 (2): 45–72.
Published: 01 May 2000
... the poet is not known, but the neomedievalism of The Faerie Queene would seem to have answered the period’s taste for the Gothic and the exotic. Moreover, the fact that the poem is in the form of an extended allegory...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2010) 37 (2): 217–225.
Published: 01 May 2010
... American Poetics (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2009). Pynchon gives “rebirth” a Kinglike echoing from gothic horror, as what zombies do. 220 boundary 2 / Summer 2010 Brotherhood army in prison, at the same time the yogic hippie flying in from other lives advises...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2020) 47 (4): 213–220.
Published: 01 November 2020
...- ness of nuance and often with violent chiaroscuro as well, moving from the Ismailis of Alamu¯t, known through the gnostic pages of a Henry Corbin, to the fabulous diabolical aura of the tales of Marco Polo, to the gothic and decadent aura of von Hammer- Purgstall, only to take on the tone of an eso...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2004) 31 (2): 35–53.
Published: 01 May 2004
... thought in Canto XXVII. Consider, too, the place in Canto XVIII where Dante plays on the Gothic capital form of the letter M. First the letter is shown to resemble the (French- Guelph-Florentine) lily, then an eagle, the movement of the wings, upright and then down, forming the last letter of the word...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2012) 39 (3): 151–167.
Published: 01 August 2012
... allegorical terms. As time goes on, Americans have become less pragmatic and more gothic in their imaginations given to allegorizing.15 Our minds are a mix of precision calculation and extreme, nearly unhinged imaginings. Allegory flourishes in such a context. What propels us to think and feel...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2005) 32 (2): 201–225.
Published: 01 May 2005
... ballast, of European colonialism. He specifically identified theories that ‘‘regarded the Hebraic- Graeco-Romano-Gothic civilization as representing the culmination of cul- tural progress’’ and construed ‘‘the eastern types of culture as if they were either monstrous or defective forms of life, or only...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (2001) 28 (1): 91–105.
Published: 01 February 2001
... course is almost entirely gruesome. The category of the gro- tesque with which Foucault introduces the course does indeed serve as a guide throughout. As he notes, the themes he discusses bear relation to the Gothic novel and to de Sade (A, 69). Disease, death, and torture shadow most lectures...