1-8 of 8 Search Results for

creeley

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2008) 35 (3): 251–262.
Published: 01 August 2008
...Ben Lerner This essay attempts to take the measure of Robert Creeley's some sixty-year commitment to poetry as a medium for tracking the processes of thinking and speaking, not for the production of finished thoughts. By reading Creeley against Wallace Stevens, I hope to both identify the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2009) 36 (3): 1–2.
Published: 01 August 2009
.... As Robert Creeley would say, Onward! ...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2009) 36 (3): 183–202.
Published: 01 August 2009
... Creeley, a strong poet if ever there was one, faced a predecessor whose overall aesthetic sensi- bility was so rhetorically overwhelming that one could not help but fall into a demotic yet abstract Stevensean vocabulary, thus “mak[ing] all acqui- esce to one’s preeminent premise.” There’s an...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2009) 36 (3): 247–250.
Published: 01 August 2009
... of poetry, most recently The Missing Occasion of 248  boundary 2  /  Fall 2009 Saying Yes (2007) and Simulcast: Four Experiments in Criticism (2004). His editorial work includes Robert Creeley’s Selected Poems, 1945–2005 (2008) and, with the late Donald Allen, Charles Olson’s Collected...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2009) 36 (3): 133–158.
Published: 01 August 2009
... the face of” could have been lifted from any of the interruption- rife prose sections of William Carlos Williams’s Spring and All (1923). The thudding monosyllabic line “Plants it there one in front” sounds uncan- nily like a quotation from Robert Creeley’s Words (1967) or Pieces (1968...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2015) 42 (1): 43–65.
Published: 01 February 2015
... characterizes the ‘errant’ measure of Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, and in another way, A. R. Ammons, and those postmodern, primarily American poets who, following Walt Whitman and William Carlos Williams, have done and are doing the most important destructive work in poetry.”9 Spanos’s...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2000) 27 (1): 151–174.
Published: 01 February 2000
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2010) 37 (2): 107–132.
Published: 01 May 2010
... Creeley, Olson, etc., but moving to become genuinely mine. I felt I could begin to stretch out, to innovate in ways I hadn’t thought of before. And in all my poetry which comes out of this period there is the ongoing and under- lying contention and struggle between myself and ‘them’ that poetry and...