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Emily Dickinson

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Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2017) 44 (3): 3–15.
Published: 01 August 2017
...Jonathan Arac To understand and evaluate Emily Dickinson's poetry forces criticism to reflect on issues of length, for which Aristotle and Edgar Allan Poe are two of the major theoretical resources, with further citation from Victor Hugo and Gustave Flaubert. Giuseppe Ungaretti's extraordinarily...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2009) 36 (3): 97–103.
Published: 01 August 2009
... perception and interspecies research, a “singing with,” not just about or like, the nonhuman animal. The infrahuman sounds of Lila Zemborain's jellyfish (“Mauve Sea Orchids”) or the revolving phonemes of Emily Dickinson's hummingbird (“A route of evanescence”) organize perception and citation along...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2010) 37 (3): 29–56.
Published: 01 August 2010
...Emily Apter Deconstruction arguably marked the last time that comparative literature was truly confident as a discipline; with a clear sight of its philological inheritance and posthumanist telos. Post-2000 comp lit, by comparison, has been plagued by insecurity over what it is and what it is not...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2009) 36 (3): 205–228.
Published: 01 August 2009
..., and Frame Structures, from Jonathan Edwards to Charles Sanders Peirce and Emily Dickinson. “Bed Hangings” itself, as Susan Bee’s parodically “genteel” images suggest,11 remains dedicated to Howe’s New England roots. But the prose sections of The Midnight, as well as the final lyric sequence...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2000) 27 (3): 287–291.
Published: 01 August 2000
..., Giorgio. Potentialities: Collected Essays in Philosophy. Ed. and trans., with an introduction, by Daniel Heller-Roazen. Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics. Stan- ford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1999. Alfrey, Shawn. The Sublime of Intense Sociability: Emily Dickinson, H.D., and Ger- trude Stein...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2008) 35 (2): 207–211.
Published: 01 May 2008
... Publishing Group, Inc., 2007. Balderston, Daniel, and Francine Masiello, eds. Approaches to Teaching Puig’s “Kiss of the Spider Woman.” Approaches to Teaching World Literature. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2007. Barnstone, Aliki. Changing Rapture: Emily Dickinson’s Poetic...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2017) 44 (3): 17–57.
Published: 01 August 2017
.../commentary/why-i-am-not-a-buddhist (accessed January 12, 2015) . ———. 2016 . Pitch of Poetry . Chicago : University of Chicago Press . Corbett William . 1987 . Review of New Selected Poems , by Rothenberg Jerome . Erato 4 : 8 . Dickinson Emily . 1955 . The Poems of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2010) 37 (2): 71–87.
Published: 01 May 2010
... presence of a man and a writer who was entirely himself and who loved his fellow man.” And on Emily Dickinson (from volume 3): “There is no better example of Puritanism.” She remains a “charmingly elfish mystery.” In volume 2, there are shortish chapters on Thoreau, Hawthorne...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2010) 37 (1): 179–200.
Published: 01 February 2010
... have taken the form of performance [David Antin’s “Modernism and Postmodernism poetry [Charles Bernstein’s “Artifice of Absorption satire [Benjamin Friedlan- der’s “The Anti-Hegemony Project captivity narrative [Susan Howe’s My Emily Dickinson], dialogue [Jerome McGann’s “A Dialogue on...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2016) 43 (2): 163–178.
Published: 01 May 2016
... attention to it. It’s visual transposition, which in itself has such a complicated relation to literature. Another chapter of “Second Chance” is on Emily Dickinson and crime novels. Many crime authors, such as Joanne Dobson in Quieter than Sleep, take their titles from Dickinson’s poetry...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2010) 37 (3): 57–68.
Published: 01 August 2010
... language. My own “workshop” was a circle of empathies I found pretty much by accident by haunting bookstores and paging through anthologies: Thomas Hardy, A. E. Housman, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman. These went along with high school enthu- siasms I learned...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 August 2009) 36 (3): 183–202.
Published: 01 August 2009
... our most important contemporary Stevensean poets, yet he is adamantly nonideological about it. Periplum and Other Poems gathers early work from 1987 to 1992, and Stevens is everywhere, although in the background. Epigraphs from Emily Dickinson, Spicer, James Schuyler, George Oppen...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2015) 42 (2): 211–229.
Published: 01 May 2015
... epistemological query” (234). Though the book busily demonstrates Stevens’s complexity, what it cannot seem to engage is how passionately it suffers that complexity, which can be so heated he might be compared to John Donne, Emily Dickinson, and especially to Shelley, the great atheist who wrote some of...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2010) 37 (1): 23–55.
Published: 01 February 2010
..., Slavoj Žižek, and Edward Said. In each of these cases, criticism becomes character- ologically distinctive: for Scarry, criticism is reverie, a meditative reflection on the world by “a beautiful soul, a contemporary Emily Dickinson . . . by so exotic a plant” (CC, 51). Nussbaum is the...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2000) 27 (2): 83–111.
Published: 01 May 2000
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 May 2016) 43 (2): 27–57.
Published: 01 May 2016
... order to do responsible criticism of prose fiction, you have to have some way of accounting to your- self for the value of partial reading. Harold Bloom’s newest book, The Dae- mon Knows (2015), illustrates this: he quotes equally big chunks from Emily Dickinson and Mark Twain, but for her, it’s...
Journal Article
boundary 2 (1 February 2006) 33 (1): 171–201.
Published: 01 February 2006