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zemi

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Series: Chronicles of the New World Encounter
Published: 25 October 1999
DOI: 10.1215/9780822382546-022
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8254-6
Series: Chronicles of the New World Encounter
Published: 25 October 1999
DOI: 10.1215/9780822382546-023
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8254-6
Series: Chronicles of the New World Encounter
Published: 25 October 1999
DOI: 10.1215/9780822382546-024
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8254-6
Series: Chronicles of the New World Encounter
Published: 25 October 1999
DOI: 10.1215/9780822382546-025
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8254-6
Series: Chronicles of the New World Encounter
Published: 25 October 1999
DOI: 10.1215/9780822382546-026
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8254-6
Series: Chronicles of the New World Encounter
Published: 25 October 1999
DOI: 10.1215/9780822382546-021
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8254-6
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.1215/9781478013099-004
EISBN: 978-1-4780-1309-9
... considered Taíno religion a form of deception and devil wor- ship. Nevertheless, his account is one of the most significant written sources through which archaeologists and historians have reconstructed pre- Columbian society in the Greater Antilles. This section recounts the production of zemis (or cemís...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 20 January 2020
DOI: 10.1215/9781478007609-002
EISBN: 978-1-4780-0760-9
... narrated their own history, as well as their religious beliefs and practices, including the use of carvings called zemis. The indigenous population was largely decimated through war, disease, and enslavement, dropping from perhaps 500,000 to 750,000 to just tens of thousands. By the time the French colony...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.1215/9781478013099-002
EISBN: 978-1-4780-1309-9
...). Women did much of the everyday labor. The Taínoan peoples shared religious practices and beliefs including the use of zemis, which were physical objects made of stone or wood that represented and sometimes hosted the gods. Their society was matrilineal, with status reckoned through the female line...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 20 January 2020
DOI: 10.1215/9781478007609-068
EISBN: 978-1-4780-0760-9
..., with their underground sortileges: the Zemis gold, the sweat of those wrenched from Africa. The Cacique Caonabo knew Anacaona, the samba. The tenderness of Jaragua was dissolved into the pride of the Cibao Valley. Flowers discovered the intoxication of bravery. When the hurricane blows, the teals whirl in circles...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.1215/9781478013099-003
EISBN: 978-1-4780-1309-9
... Taíno to the Classic Taíno of Hispaniola, Puerto Rico and eastern Cuba. Rouse identified four artifact or feature types that distinguish the Classic group as ball courts/bateyes, wooden stools/duhos, stone zemis and petro- 16 Kit W. Wesler glyphs. All but the ball courts have been documented in Jamaica...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 20 January 2020
DOI: 9781478007609-7
EISBN: 978-1-4780-0760-9
... narrated their own history, as well as their religious beliefs and practices, including the use of carvings called zemis. The indigenous population was largely decimated through war, disease, and enslavement, dropping from perhaps 500,000 to 750,000 to just tens of thousands. By the time the French colony...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 20 January 2020
DOI: 10.1215/9781478007609-127
EISBN: 978-1-4780-0760-9
..., 267, 279, 282 83 Vodou, 8, 61, 123, 233, 239, 253, 270, 304, 377, 403, 405, 464, 475, 478 79; and music, 13 14, 437; repression of, 265 66; Saut d Eau pilgrimage and, 357 64; in work of Rene Depestre, 342 48; in work of Franke - tienne, 372 Zaka, 359, 363 64 zemis, 8 12, 277 Ze phyr, Leme te, 502 8 ...
Book Chapter

By Chelsea Szendi Schieder
Series: Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society
Published: 22 January 2021
DOI: 10.1215/9781478012979-008
EISBN: 978-1-4780-1297-9
...! Tachi nobor ! Tento mura ni sanka shiy [To all school comrades! Stand up! Get involved in the tent village July 1968, Todai t s shiryo sh [University of Tokyo struggle collection]. 46. Tokeidai jishu zemi: Kay k za 7- gatsu 30- nichi pm 4- ji [Clock tower self- directed seminar: Tuesday course July...
Published: 01 January 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822372370-013
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7237-0
... and familiar by the colonizers as a foolish, superstitious, naïve fe- tish, the zemi. 1 The unfamiliar is dismissed as unimportant through the u n d e a d d a R w in iS M 115 per for mance or guise of universal knowing, through translation of the cul- turally diff er ent into the culturally same. In a similar...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.1215/9781478013099-135
EISBN: 978-1-4780-1309-9
..., 262, 266 yaws, 87 Youth Black Faith (Rastafarian group), 253, 254, 257 258 zemis/cemís, 8, 17 20 ...
Book Chapter

By Laura E. Pérez
Published: 01 January 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822372370-022
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7237-0
...), for a discussion of how the initially unfamil- iar religious object and its function understood as a zemi was eventually translated N O T E S T O C H A P T E R 1 4 229 into the idea of the demonic and superstitious fetish, as part of the colonizing war on the indigenous imaginary. 2. For further discussion...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 20 January 2020
DOI: 10.1215/9781478007609-061
EISBN: 978-1-4780-0760-9