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Published: 31 May 2001
DOI: 10.1215/9780822381051-010
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8105-1
Published: 15 October 2010
DOI: 10.1215/9780822393207-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-9320-7
Published: 02 April 2012
DOI: 10.1215/9780822393306-010
EISBN: 978-0-8223-9330-6
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.1215/9780822392835-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-9283-5
Published: 08 November 2002
DOI: 10.1215/9780822384236-012
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8423-6
Published: 07 October 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... The prologue opens with the popular image of personal genetics in California as a contrast to the collective approach to genomic science in Singapore. It argues that a study of contemporary medical science in Asia should move beyond the binary West–Asia framework in medical anthropology. The...
Published: 07 October 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373643-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... This chapter discusses the creation of multiethnic DNA databases in Singapore and why scientists there consider their genomic data to be more important than that captured by DeCODE in Iceland. Citing variability in DNA and populations in the Asian region, Singaporean biostatisticians claim that...
Published: 07 October 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373643-003
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... This chapter provides information on the streamlining of Singapore’s public health system as an institutional foundation for the rise of Biopolis. The rapid introduction of a bioethics committee and op-out organs law installed international best practices for stem cell research and medical...
Book Chapter

By Aihwa Ong
Published: 07 October 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... This chapter discusses the creation of multiethnic DNA databases in Singapore and why scientists there consider their genomic data to be more important than that captured by DeCODE in Iceland. Citing variability in DNA and populations in the Asian region, Singaporean biostatisticians claim that...
Book Chapter

By Aihwa Ong
Published: 07 October 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373643-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... This chapter introduces the author’s family stories of cancer as a way to present oncology’s recognition of the genetic diversity of this class of diseases. The main focus is on how the Singaporean focus on Asian cancer research generates “contrary affects” of anxiety and optimism. Singapore is...
Published: 07 October 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373643-001
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... This chapter discusses the creation of multiethnic DNA databases in Singapore and why scientists there consider their genomic data to be more important than that captured by DeCODE in Iceland. Citing variability in DNA and populations in the Asian region, Singaporean biostatisticians claim that...
Published: 07 October 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373643-009
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... This chapter discusses the rise of Singapore as a potential to provide a CDC-like center for a tropical region that is teeming with deadly viruses. In the aftermath of the SARS pandemic, the Duke-NUS Graduate School of Medicine established a program to deal with epidemiological dangers that are...
Published: 07 October 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373643-006
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... aligned with stages in an international career path. Foreign lab assistants, many from China and India, tend to view science more as an overseas job opportunity than a vocation. By contrast, locally born scientists, scientific virtue, and civic duty are entangled In the emergence of Singapore as a...
Published: 12 August 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373902-009
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7390-2
... Continuing the exploration of individualization and gender, chapter 8 surveys women’s lifestyle-advice shows from China and Taiwan, drawing on audience research on the reception of these shows across China, Taiwan, and Singapore to explore transforming models of feminine identity in the...
Book Chapter

By Aihwa Ong
Published: 07 October 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... which showed their hereditary links to larger populations. By integrating indigenous groups in the constitution of majority populations, the SNP project fills in vital gaps in the regional and global picture of human biological and cultural diversity. This chapter discusses the rise of Singapore...
Published: 07 October 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373643-011
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... of sequencing DNA and perturbing cells as lifesaving therapies in Asia? How can the public be party to discussions on ethical limits to such experiments? Like any of the best-conceived biopolitical plans—to improve health and wealth—the innovative ethno-genomic experiments in Singapore can go awry...
Book Chapter

By Aihwa Ong
Published: 07 October 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7364-3
... virtue, and civic duty are entangled In the emergence of Singapore as a regional biomedical hub. Here, I discuss the affect of kiasu, or the fear of losing/failure, as an additional pressure on native scientists to recruit, train, and inspire younger Asian scientists to eventually take over the...
Published: 22 December 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822374756-010
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7475-6
... Woodside, where they have lived for the past ten years, you can fnd neighbors from Singapore, Puerto Rico, and Italy; there are African Americans, Tibetans, Indi- ans, and Chinese. For an outsider, perhaps it is easy to ft into a place where there is no single normal pattern...
Published: 01 January 2013
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7756-6
... music, as well as the inter-­Asia cultural studies. He was research fellow at ari (Asia Research Institute) at the National University of Singapore and taught at Leiden University in the Netherlands as visiting professor. He is currently a member of the International Advisory Editors of Popular...
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.1215/9780822380757-009
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8075-7
... tourists being asked by ocws in Singapore shopping malls or Madrid parks if they, too, are on their day o√. In these stories, Filipino elites as well as nationalists feel themselves incapable of maintaining the boundaries of class di√erence as they are associated with an ethnically marked group of...