1-20 of 32 Search Results for

quechua

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: Narrating Native Histories
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.1215/9780822394853-006
EISBN: 978-0-8223-9485-3
Published: 30 September 2010
EISBN: 978-0-8223-9317-7
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-099
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
Series: Narrating Native Histories
Published: 11 November 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7375-9
... haciendas Ccaccamarca communism Cold War Quechua ...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-035
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... The Quechua poet Juan Wallparimachi Mayta’s background and tragic life are the stuff of legend. According to one account, he was of mixed Inka and Spanish parentage, and raised from a young age by Indians in the region of Potosí. He fell in love with the young wife of a wealthy Spanish mineowner...
Series: Narrating Native Histories
Published: 11 November 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373759-003
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7375-9
... the Quechua language and his vision of the need for anticolonial orthography. haciendas Ccaccamarca communism Cold War Quechua ...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-026
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... was born in Oruro in modest circumstances and orphaned as a child. He grew up fluent in Spanish, Aymara, and Quechua and joined the patriots fighting against Spain as a young man. He was a writer by vocation, though his style is unpolished, and his diary, covering the period between 1814 and 1825...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-015
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
..., their Aymara neighbors see them as beings who are associated with a lack of civilization and a pre-baptismal era. The testimony of the Uru Murato elder and leader Daniel Moricio tells of his ancestors’ encounter with the Spaniards, whom he refers to almost indistinctly from the Aymara and Quechua...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-065
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
.... The first peasant unions had emerged in Cochabamba in the Ucureña area, in 1936. President Víctor Paz Estenssoro returned to the same location on 2 August 1953, to promulgate the Agrarian Reform Decree, in Spanish with oral translations in Quechua and Aymara. The announcement was met with the warm applause...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-010
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... communities that once formed part of Qollasuyu. This version is a synopsis by the anthropologist Tristan Platt, based on his fieldwork in the modern Quechua-speaking community of Macha, in northern Potosí. 1 Many accounts of the Spanish invasion of the Americas suggest that the contest between...
Series: The Lewis Henry Morgan Lectures
Published: 21 September 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375265-001
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7526-5
... of Spanish and Quechua interpenetrating each other. equivocation partial connections excess Ranajit Guha Marilyn Strathern Donna Haraway Eduardo Viveiros de Castro ...
Published: 12 October 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375074-005
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7507-4
... This chapter revisits the cosmology of indigenous numeracy, drawing on both Mayan and Quechua counting to argue that they engage practices of rectification that support, even as they are not exactly equivalent to, the labors of number in human rights accountancy. The chapter contemplates...
Series: The Lewis Henry Morgan Lectures
Published: 21 September 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375265-009
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7526-5
... This story presents Nazario’s conceptualization of the state as munayniyuq--—a Quechua word that is translated as “owner of the will.” During Mariano’s time peasants used the word to refer to the hacendado: they had to blindly obey him or risk imprisonment, torture, and death. In 2002...
Published: 09 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375869-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7586-9
... This chapter focuses on the protests against the expansion of the Yanacocha gold mine into Cerro Quilish (Mount Quilish). In campaigns against the mining project, Cerro Quilish was an aquifer (a store of life-sustaining water) and an Apu (usually translated from Quechua as “sacred mountain...
Published: 08 December 2023
DOI: 10.1215/9781478027560-006
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2756-0
... Bolivia's most consequential educative and cultural sphere flourished on the margins—in the informal spaces of the peasant assembly, agrarian union, regional congress, and incipient leftist political party. Myriad forms of popular education nurtured this postwar generation of Aymara-and Quechua-speaking...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... coordination involved intensive grain production and the redistribution of surpluses, new territorial administration, and the massive movement of people, known as mitmaqkuna in Quechua or mitimaes in Spanish, to colonize new areas. These colonizing groups came from different regions and fulfilled diverse...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-108
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... of Aymara and Quechua peasant struggles during the twentieth century and was written as the militant peasant union movement had burst on the scene as a national political force. The movement’s strength derived in part from a complex historical consciousness that Rivera creatively analyzed in terms of short...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-007
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... in Quechua or mitimaes in Spanish, to colonize new areas. These colonizing groups came from different regions and fulfilled diverse functions—political, military, agricultural, and artisanal—in the Tawantinsuyu realm. Known as the “prince of Peruvian chroniclers,” Pedro Cieza de León (1520–54) visited...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-142
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... “ Living well”— vivir bien or buen vivir in Spanish—is a translation of the Aymara term suma qamaña and the Quechua sumak kawsay, which are now offcially taken up in the constitutions of Bolivia and Ecuador. The language also circulates in other parts of Latin America and even other continents...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-121
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
.... As a poet, Espejo writes in Aymara, Quechua, and Spanish, and her work delves deeply into her Andean roots. The poems that follow—from her collection Phaqar kirki / T’ikha takiy / Canto a las flores (Song for the Flowers)—draw from her intimate familiarity with the material and symbolic world of plants...