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foreigners' camps

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Book: Brutalism
Series: Theory in Forms
Published: 24 December 2023
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2772-0
... universal history nomos of the earth digital computation borderization foreigners' camps ...
Book: Brutalism
Series: Theory in Forms
Published: 24 December 2023
DOI: 10.1215/9781478027720-003
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2772-0
....” universal history nomos of the earth digital computation borderization foreigners' camps ...
Series: Theory in Forms
Published: 05 January 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478027379-005
EISBN: 978-1-4780-9370-1
... with foreign architects—that is, professionals trained in spatial planning and aesthetics, rather than civil engineering—who worked in Dadaab during the earliest phases of relief operations. It ends with Dadaab's architects, in a photo essay on Ifo camp's food and water distribution, the primary function...
Published: 24 March 2017
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373032-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7303-2
..., chapter 3 highlights how Communism was framed as fundamentally alien to China’s Confucian national spirit. Communism was decadent, degenerate, foreign, and antiproductive. This helped to shore up an image of the Nationalist state as productive, familiar, wholesome, and capable of modernizing China without...
Published: 20 May 2010
DOI: 10.1215/9780822391357-008
EISBN: 978-0-8223-9135-7
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-060
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... economic development in the country. The unbalanced western orientation of the country, he held, resulted from the influence of foreign imperialism and the highland mining interests with their narrowly external outlook. The history of agrarian Bolivia has been analyzed and narrated almost entirely...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-120
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... movements and civil society in Cochabamba. Even the rain, Olivera points out, was considered a resource to be commodified by Law 2029, the neoliberal legislation on drinking water and sanitation. According to Olivera, powerful corporate interests, especially foreign ones, sought to appropriate public goods...