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extralegality

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Published: 26 January 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478027751-003
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2775-1
.... The chapter elaborates on the forms of violent intimacies constituted between trans people and police officers, who embody state power through legal and extralegal means of surveillance and securitization. By constantly negotiating the process of surveillance and securitization, trans women oblige the police...
Book Chapter

By Aslı Zengin
Published: 26 January 2024
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2775-1
... surveillance securitization extralegality the police sex work ...
Published: 04 September 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375296-003
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7529-6
... of the US’s enemies, captured within prisons and again within the frames of photography. Media consumers consent to the war by silently ignoring and/or virtually touring the clear-coated versions of the extralegal institutions established in the name of prosecuting the war on terror and visually consuming...
Published: 26 January 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478027751-002
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2775-1
... of public life in violent ways that include the use of spatial techniques of surveillance and securitization, extralegal police violence, urban transformation projects, and the flow of neoliberal capital into their neighborhoods. Yet everyday trans struggles over urban landscape are not only about constant...
Published: 11 November 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375050-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7505-0
..., and unfree state, and proceed directly to abolition. Then the chapter presents the ways that black working people contested the official version of freedom through informal and often extralegal negotiations with their employers over issues such as wages, work schedules, workplace duties, the labor of women...
Published: 11 November 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375050-007
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7505-0
... working people employed a variety of legal and extralegal strategies to maintain livelihoods both within and without the sugar industry. Setting cane fires, practicing obeah, and committing petty theft—though deemed criminal by authorities and white elites—appear to have had more economic and political...