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educational broadcasting

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Published: 03 June 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822374466-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7446-6
... This chapter introduces part I, which examines program types that revolve around prioritizing realism as a representational tool to advance the ideological tenets of socialism in an educational fashion, modeled after the European public service broadcasting agenda and developed in a...
Published: 03 June 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7446-6
... This chapter introduces part I, which examines program types that revolve around prioritizing realism as a representational tool to advance the ideological tenets of socialism in an educational fashion, modeled after the European public service broadcasting agenda and developed in a...
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375807-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7580-7
... the historical mission of educational tele- vision—known after the 1967 Public Broadcasting Act as public televi- sion, the modifier expressing a more populist branding and outlook— were deeply embedded in a discourse of patronage that saw black ghetto residents as not merely economically and...
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375807-006
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7580-7
... still referred to by its older and stodgier name, educational television—most Americans consid- ered it a boon to democracy and appreciated its existence. As one draft memorandum to the president noted, “the current concept of Federal funding creates a dilemma—striking at public broadcasting...
Published: 29 April 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822374428-005
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7442-8
... support for Indigenous broadcasting has decreased. These endeavors also implicate media organizations in additional regimes of fiscal and managerial oversight. In focusing on 4AAA’s interests in expanding their work into education, the chapter thus outlines the complications faced by an Aboriginal...
Published: 29 April 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822374435-007
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7443-5
... This chapter further expands the boundaries of the memorial to consider educational programs in the form of teacher workshops organized or coorganized by the author each summer for seven years with grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Given sponsorship from a federal agency...
Published: 27 April 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375579-007
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7557-9
... The epilogue explores links between the early 20th Mexico City penny press and an early 21st century radio show, Erazno y la Chokolata, broadcast every afternoon in the western and southern United States. Although not especially political, the show resembles the penny press in other ways: its...
Book Chapter

By Gayle Wald
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375807-008
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7580-7
... York Times, December 8, 1968. 46. Day, The Vanishing Vision, 191. 47. wndt (Educational Broadcasting Corp Ford Foundation Project for New Television Programming, Program Proposal, April 25, 1968, cover sheet. pa 68–683, Ford Foundation Archives. 48. wndt (Educational Broadcasting Corp...
Book Chapter

By Gayle Wald
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375807-009
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7580-7
... Hoover’s fbi. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2014. 260 Bibliography Meyer, Richard J. “etv and the Ghetto.” Educational Broadcasting Review 2 (August 1968): 19–24. Minow, Newton N. “Television and the Public Interest.” Federal Communica- tions Law Journal 55 (2002–3), 395–406...
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375685-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7568-5
... This chapter centers on the ways in which television reviewers, private entities, some audience members, and the State conceptualized morality for television. Initially, discussions about morality and decency on television intersected with ideals of education and high culture. Additionally...
Published: 08 January 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7494-7
... “post-9/11 Brown”—an antiracist global political subjectivity that critiques U.S. empire. Linking racism at home to imperialism abroad, hip hop artists draw on the potentially democratizing technologies of social media (i.e., YouTube and Facebook) to broadcast their critiques of politicians and living...
Book Chapter

By Gayle Wald
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375807-010
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7580-7
... administration (Richard Nixon): National Association of Educational cointelpro (Counter Intelligence Broadcasters, 50 – 51 Program), 28, 229n55; federal author- National Black Political Conventions, ity over television under, 28; local 163...
Book Chapter

By Banning Eyre
Published: 27 April 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375425-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7542-5
... one Rhodesia oppressed with a velvet touch, and music was one of its tools. Th e Federation introduced centralized radio broadcasting in 1948 as a way to shape thought and opinion. A government pamphlet of the era argued that education might take two or three generations to produce a...
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.1215/9780822377566-013
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7756-6
... EVENING OF JUNE 18, 2002 I was sitting in front of the tv in a restaurant in Pongch’ŏndong in Seoul with friends and schoolmates in order to watch the live broadcast of the Round of 16 soccer match, which pitted South Korea against Italy in the 2002 Korea/Japan World Cup. That evening, the people...
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375807-003
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7580-7
... from conception to broadcast within a matter of four months—a seat-of-­ ­the-­pants affair, with scouting and booking during the week, followed by rehearsals at eleven on Thursday morn- ings and broadcasts the same evening at nine. (Viewers who missed the live airing could catch a broadcast of...
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.1215/9780822377566-016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7756-6
.... Lyricists were mostly intellectuals who re- ceived higher education in the cities, while singers, particularly females, did not. The gender difference in terms of their social status will be examined in connection with their sonic characteristics and performance practices. In doing so, this chapter...
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375807-001
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7580-7
... shows on tv, Soul! was the only nationally televised program dedi- cated to cultural expressions of the black freedom movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. For five seasons beginning in 1968—first lo- cally on wndt (later wnet; Channel 13, New York City’s main public broadcasting outlet...
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.1215/9780822377566-012
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7756-6
...- nese flag’s rising sun. As captured by Jung Hwan Cheon’s detailed coverage of Sohn Kee- ’s victory­chung race via the nhk live radio broadcast, Korean pride was un - precedented at his winning an Olympic gold medal, the first for a Korean. His ac- complishment created what Cheon called a “syndrome...
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.1215/9780822377566-005
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7756-6
... destroying ene- mies by teaching phrases like “Wanna turn up the heat?” LEARNING ENGLISH: IT’S NO GAME? Even before StarCraft came along, English was a major factor that acceler- ated the adoption of the computer and the Internet. Many parents bought their children computers to run educational...
Published: 04 March 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822375807-007
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7580-7
... programs’ demise? Such was the question being posed by the editors of Freedomways, which devoted its third issue of 1974 to “The Black Image in the Mass Media.” Pick- ing up on the themes of the letter by the Soul! viewer Ruth McLean, which Haizlip read aloud in the program’s final broadcast...