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cultural property rights

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Published: 11 January 2012
DOI: 10.1215/9780822394587-005
EISBN: 978-0-8223-9458-7
Series: School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar
Published: 05 April 2017
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7326-1
... ethnographic truth verisimilitude fidelity cultural property rights negative capability ...
Series: School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar
Published: 05 April 2017
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373261-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7326-1
... verisimilitude fidelity cultural property rights negative capability ...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-064
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... coming from the left, Eduardo del Granado’s polemical text, which follows, defends the rural elite’s property rights and invokes its presumed technical and cultural superiority as a basis for agrarian productivity. It also denounces the perceived threat of tyrannical communism: if the institute were...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-060
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... text, which follows, defends the rural elite’s property rights and invokes its presumed technical and cultural superiority as a basis for agrarian productivity. It also denounces the perceived threat of tyrannical communism: if the institute were to take charge of the agricultural labor code...
Published: 26 March 2003
DOI: 10.1215/9780822383819-004
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8381-9
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-074
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
...—the “old documents” referred to here—became the basis for the property rights of the communities in the twentieth century. Paradoxically, the indigenous leaders were taking advantage of both colonial and liberal legal resources in order to block the encroachment of the haciendas. For their correspondence...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-042
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... citizens regardless of caste or race. At the same time, it aimed to break up collective landholding by Indians, on the grounds that communal property was a drag on the land market and economic productivity, and to grant titles to individual proprietors who would be free to buy and sell it. From this point...
Published: 05 August 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7402-2
.... However, hydropower development entails the displacement and resettlement of thousands of people belonging to historically marginalized groups who stand to lose access to the agricultural land that supports their livelihoods. This raises key questions about rural property rights regimes and the new ways...
Series: Perverse modernities
Published: 19 April 2007
DOI: 10.1215/9780822389903-006
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8990-3
Published: 26 March 2003
DOI: 10.1215/9780822383819-001
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8381-9
Published: 26 March 2003
DOI: 10.1215/9780822383819-006
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8381-9
Book Chapter

By Sean Cubitt
Series: a Cultural Politics Book
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373476-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7347-6
... consumption by computing media, it addresses the energy requirements of network media, especially data centers and cloud computing. It continues with an analysis of centralized electricity generation, showing how standardization procedures and intellectual property rights increase energy usage. Emphasizing...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-141
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... The right-wing fury and the regionalist revolt that accompanied the drafting of Bolivia’s new constitution, between 2006 and 2008, brought on a full-scale political crisis that threatened to fracture the nation. After winning a popular referendum on his government in August 2008, President Evo...
Published: 12 October 2015
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7507-4
...Mayan Pyramids This chapter tells the story of a Mayan woman, over the sixteen years the author has known her, who went from being a hamlet schoolteacher and cultural rights activist through increasing involvement in transnational networks—which were like and unlike the ngo connections...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-073
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... issued by the Spanish Crown—the “old documents” referred to here—became the basis for the property rights of the communities in the twentieth century. Paradoxically, the indigenous leaders were taking advantage of both colonial and liberal legal resources in order to block the encroachment...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-037
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... by communities that had purchased the rights to their lands in the colonial period, a new law admitted that community lands with colonial titles were exempt from the survey. The outcomes of the liberal land legislation were mixed and uneven. Indigenous tribute ended, but in practice, the new property tax...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-136
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... of political and social transition, since it marginalized Camba culture and threatened to suppress it in the national dialogue over a new constitution. Yet, as the following photographs reveal, the opposition to the Morales government was quick to combine resistance to the shifts in political and economic...
Book Chapter

By Kathleen Diffley
Published: 03 April 2002
DOI: 10.1215/9780822385967-026
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8596-7
..., especially as the voluminous scholarship on the Civil War, ambient culture, and wartime literature continues to grow. What follows is an effort to “walk chalk,” as Twain’s Aunt Rachel might say, from the war’s prelude to its aftermath. For the antebellum clash at homesteads like “The Cabin at Pharaoh’s...
Book Chapter

By Kathleen Diffley
Published: 03 April 2002
DOI: 10.1215/9780822385967-003
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8596-7
... study, especially as the voluminous scholarship on the Civil War, ambient culture, and wartime literature continues to grow. What follows is an effort to “walk chalk,” as Twain’s Aunt Rachel might say, from the war’s prelude to its aftermath. For the antebellum clash at homesteads like “The Cabin...