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belzu

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Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-050
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... In much of mid-nineteenth-century Latin America, charismatic military or political leaders with popular followings were common figures. In Bolivia, General Manuel Isidoro Belzu (1848–55), who gained the allegiance of urban artisans and plebeians in La Paz, was an exceptional example...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-051
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... Born in northern Argentina, Juana Manuela Gorriti (1818–92) accompanied her family into political exile in Bolivia, where at age fifteen she married Manuel Isidoro Belzu, then an army captain, with whom she went on to bear three children. Belzu left her nine years later, amid mutual accusations...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-047
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... vernacular versions of d’Orbigny’s drawings (see color plates) to provide a nationalist counterpoint. In much of mid-nineteenth-century Latin America, charismatic military or political leaders with popular followings were common figures. In Bolivia, General Manuel Isidoro Belzu (1848–55), who gained...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-040
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... and alludes to his political vicissitudes. He was exiled from the country by Presidents Belzu, Melgarejo, and Morales, all army generals, and was a fierce opponent of military government. In consistent liberal vein, he also opposed state regulation and taxation, state control of mineral purchasing, as well...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-053
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... Artesano , at the time when President Belzu was encouraging the political participation of the urban plebeian population. Twenty years later, Corral relied on his ties with the indigenous communities around La Paz to stage the coup d’état, termed a “revolution,” that brought to power Coronel Agustín...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-037
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... investment. In the following passages, from his Notes on the State of Industry, Economy, and Politics in Bolivia (1871), he recounts his rising economic fortunes and alludes to his political vicissitudes. He was exiled from the country by Presidents Belzu, Melgarejo, and Morales, all army generals...