1-6 of 6 Search Results for

allotment

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter

By Mark Rifkin
Published: 03 February 2017
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7342-1
... John Joseph Mathews Osage allotment queer duration ...
Published: 03 February 2017
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373421-003
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7342-1
... In his novel Sundown (1934), John Joseph Mathews traces how allotment pressures Osages to conform to a vision of futurity defined by the state’s extension of authority over Native peoples and lands. He explores how Osage histories of placemaking influence ordinary perception in ways...
Published: 13 May 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822374367-005
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7436-7
... traditional food sources and kinship systems in favor of wage labor, sedentary farming, and compulsory heterosexuality ultimately freed land and resources for settler profit. From allotment to commodity food programs, federal Indian policy imposed norms of settler society onto Native communities. Given...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-008
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
...), such as Yllaurco and Colchacollo, were allotted to 14,000 colonists “of many nations,” such as the Col-las, Soras, Quillacas, Carangas, Charcas, Qaraqaras, and Chichas. Most would have been seasonal corvée workers performing their labor turns, or mita , under the supervision of their own lords, here termed...
Published: 13 May 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7436-7
... traditional food sources and kinship systems in favor of wage labor, sedentary farming, and compulsory heterosexuality ultimately freed land and resources for settler profit. From allotment to commodity food programs, federal Indian policy imposed norms of settler society onto Native communities. Given...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
..., intensive production of corn. Five primary grain farms (called chácaras in these extracts), such as Yllaurco and Colchacollo, were allotted to 14,000 colonists “of many nations,” such as the Col-las, Soras, Quillacas, Carangas, Charcas, Qaraqaras, and Chichas. Most would have been seasonal corvée workers...