1-20 of 23 Search Results for

Land Back

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter

By Matt Hooley
Published: 15 March 2024
EISBN: 978-1-4780-5936-3
... Louise Erdrich domestic allotment social vacancy Land Back ...
Book Chapter

By Matt Hooley
Published: 15 March 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478059363-003
EISBN: 978-1-4780-5936-3
... of “land back.” Louise Erdrich domestic allotment social vacancy Land Back ...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-042
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... The Law of Disentailment (Ley de Exvinculación) of 1874 was the culmination of liberal reform initiatives going back to the late-colonial period and to Bolívar. It sought to end the colonial institution of Indian tribute and replace it with a universal tax on the land, to be collected from all...
Series: The Lewis Henry Morgan Lectures
Published: 04 August 2023
DOI: 10.1215/9781478024538-002
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2453-8
... The chapter offers an ethnographic itinerary around the Netherlands, a country shaped by centuries-old endeavors to hold waves back from a land situated below sea level. Waves, long interpreted as forces of a wild, enemy nature, have come to be read as entities that might be rewritten...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-008
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... and Indians of the Paria region in Oruro and their rivals from the Sipesipe region in Cochabamba, both of whom claimed lands in the valley. The documents show in intricate detail the profound transformations wrought by the Inka rulers Tupac Yupanqui (1471–93) and especially Wayna Qhapaq (or Guayna Capac, 1493...
Book Chapter

By Bill Anthes
Published: 04 September 2015
DOI: 10.1215/9780822374992-005
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7499-2
... This thematic chapter returns to tribal lands in Oklahoma, bringing the artist back home in a path that recalls indigenous understanding of time as circular and cyclical. The chapter focuses on public artworks, including temporary sign panels in London and Vancouver, collaborations...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-099
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... their ancestral “indigenous” identity for the class status of “peasants.” Yet despite the overhaul of the land-tenure regime, by the 1960s, the illusions of progress began to dissipate. Above all on the Aymara altiplano, different organizations began to pursue a more autonomous course, and they adopted the name...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-037
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... brought about an economic and political restructuring that ushered in the age of full-blown liberalization. One of his key measures was an unprecedented attack on indigenous community lands. In 1866, a decree declared community lands to be state property, and for Indians to retain their plots, they were...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-010
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... with native lords, for example to consolidate the mita (forced labor draft), he sought, with some success, to undercut their influence over the indigenous population. The lords nevertheless fought back and in this case maneuvered in the Spanish court to defend their presumed traditional rights...
Published: 06 October 2008
DOI: 10.1215/9780822389231-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8923-1
Series: Narrating Native Histories
Published: 27 August 2014
DOI: 10.1215/9780822376552-010
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7655-2
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-091
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
...Dictatorship and Democracy The national revolutionary cycle that commenced in 1952 came to a close with the U.S.-backed military coup of General René Barrientos Ortuño in November 1964. Barrientos combined personal charisma and patronage tactics to establish the so-called Military-Peasant...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
.... It also reflects his concept of the “vertical archipelago,” a spatial strategy of highland groups to access dispersed lands at lower elevations in other ethnic territories. Andean space was profoundly transformed by the waves of colonization organized by successive Inka sovereigns. Inka state...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-125
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... In early 2001, civic leaders and separatists in Santa Cruz published a “memorandum” that established the Autonomous Movement of the Camba Nation, announcing the movement’s strategic objectives and its grievances against the Bolivian state. Its rhetoric and demands harkened back to the memorandum...
Published: 05 December 2023
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2380-7
... the “perfect city.” These new developments had an essentially practical value, providing more land for expansion in this extremely densely developed city, but they also all contributed toward the renovatio urbis and the creation of the “ideal” capital city. In addition, the period saw a series of measures...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-029
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... line of Tupac Amaru in Cuzco, Katari meant that those born in the An-des were the ones who should live, govern, and control the wealth in the territory, whereas Europeans should withdraw or be sent back to their own lands. Also notable is Katari’s effort to assert political legitimacy. He claimed...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-110
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... Lozada’s first term (1993–97), his Revolutionary Nationalist Movement ( mnr ) government undertook a series of legal, political, and economic measures that continued to roll back the reforms introduced by the mnr during the National Revolution of 1952. While his political and cultural policies were...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-060
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... on haciendas around La Paz and Lake Titicaca before the agrarian reform of 1953, which overturned the hacienda regime. The testimonies depict the lives of women tied to the land, livestock, and artisanal manufacturing, in opposition to the world of politics, careers, and honor in the public sphere...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-120
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... thirty-four days in 1990. The motivations behind the march emerged especially in the department of Beni, as a reaction against the appropriation of ancestral indigenous lands by logging companies, and to the south of Moxos province, as a reaction against encroachment by illicit coca growers. The march...
Series: The Latin America Readers
Published: 06 July 2018
DOI: 10.1215/9780822371618-047
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7161-8
... of the terminology “Christians” and “savages” to describe the two sides in the conflict, the old conquest framework persisted on the frontier of the new nation. The government of the caudillo strongman General Mariano Melgarejo (1864–71) was the first to expropriate indigenous community lands on a massive...