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Black image-making

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Book Chapter

By Ashleigh Greene Wade
Published: 26 January 2024
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2773-7
... self-curation digital archives social media Black image-making ...
Published: 26 January 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478027737-004
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2773-7
... Moving from a discussion of how girls make spaces, chapter 2 demonstrates how the spaces that Black girls have created have allowed informal archives of Black life to materialize. Connecting Black girls’ digital image-making to traditions of Black vernacular photography and videography along...
Published: 10 June 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822374657-009
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7465-7
... In this chapter, Jennifer DeVere Brody situates E. Patrick Johnson’s play Strange Fruit within a critical genealogy of black gay image-making. Brody asserts that Johnson’s artistic work, along with that of other black queer men, facilitated the emergence of black queer studies. Brody...
Published: 26 January 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478027737-005
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2773-7
..., genres of hypervisiblity in Black girls’ online images: ratchet performativity, sexualization, and flexin. It argues that this deliberate act of making oneself hypervisible operates as a form of refusal through which Black girls reject responsibility for an anti-Black image regime that tries to strip...
Published: 27 October 2023
DOI: 10.1215/9781478027249-012
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2724-9
... This chapter explores Black place-making as the life-giving work of making freedom geographically. In contrast to white Cartesianism, it considers Black life and landscapes as intrinsically linked to ancestral temporalities, acts of resistance, and everyday inhabitance. Through a study of post...
Published: 16 September 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822373711-011
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7371-1
... Kortney Ziegler examines Harlem Renaissance performance artist Gladys Bentley and the ways her manipulations of gender suggest a kinky politics that offers a new space of black queer possibility. Known for her appropriations of a fetishized image of black masculinity during the 1920s, Bentley...
Published: 10 June 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7465-7
...Part III In this chapter, Jennifer DeVere Brody situates E. Patrick Johnson’s play Strange Fruit within a critical genealogy of black gay image-making. Brody asserts that Johnson’s artistic work, along with that of other black queer men, facilitated the emergence of black queer studies...
Published: 27 October 2023
EISBN: 978-1-4780-2724-9
... activists worked to make space for Black life in a market economy dependent on the uneven devaluation of people and place, through an alternatively collaborative and critical relationship with state agencies. The vision of a “new Hunters Point” stems from a branch of the blues epistemology Clyde Woods...
Published: 10 June 2016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7465-7
... Bridgforth’s writing, performance, and revision practices. Richardson ultimately concludes that Bridgforth’s deployment of the jazz aesthetic in The love conjure/blues Text Installation enables Bridgforth to honor simultaneous truths, which pries open a space for reenvisioning black communal healing...
Published: 29 April 2016
DOI: 10.1215/9780822374510-002
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7451-0
... in contemporary art. Engaging closely with Michel Foucault’s concept of genealogy as an alternative to heroic and monumental modes of historiography, the chapter describes a paradigm shift away from earlier efforts to recover black history, which were confident that representation could make present what had been...
Book Chapter

By Beeta Baghoolizadeh
Published: 23 February 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478059257-006
EISBN: 978-1-4780-5925-7
...Erasure Part II opens with a vignette about Reza Shah and a horrifying story that circulates in a small port city in southern Iran, about the limits of racism and dehumanization of Black people. Reza Shah Iran racism anti-Black abolition Chapter 4 supplies an in-depth analysis...
Series: Visual Arts of Africa and its Diasporas
Published: 01 March 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478059165-014
EISBN: 978-1-4780-5916-5
... in the present and reconnect to their ancestors. They draw on the visual and gestural vocabularies of Black performance art while incorporating site-specificity and contextual references to ground their work in a history of trauma and healing. This essay argues that through their performances Raimundi-Ortiz...
Published: 05 June 2012
DOI: 10.1215/9780822394563-009
EISBN: 978-0-8223-9456-3
Book Chapter

By Ann Snitow
Published: 14 August 2015
EISBN: 978-0-8223-7567-8
... of differences between America (white hats and black hats) and England (shades of grey); her love for the novelist Christina Stead, whom she considers one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century; her analysis of the difference between French socialism (logical, Lenin) and English (dreamy, Romantic...
Series: Visual Arts of Africa and its Diasporas
Published: 01 March 2024
DOI: 10.1215/9781478059165-002
EISBN: 978-1-4780-5916-5
... Wheatley, has long been understood as the first printed portrait of a named African American in the British Americas. This essay challenges the veracity of this myth and examines the various ways that Black women were imaged during the late eighteenth century. It argues for the broader significance...
Book Chapter

By Kathleen Diffley
Published: 03 April 2002
DOI: 10.1215/9780822385967-026
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8596-7
... reply, 115–23. Thoughtfully diverging views appear in James M. McPherson, “Who Freed the Slave?”, in Drawn with the Sword, 192–207; George M. Fredrickson, The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate on Afro-American Character and Destiny, 1817–1914 (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1971...
Book Chapter

By Kathleen Diffley
Published: 03 April 2002
DOI: 10.1215/9780822385967-003
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8596-7
... reply, 115–23. Thoughtfully diverging views appear in James M. McPherson, “Who Freed the Slave?”, in Drawn with the Sword, 192–207; George M. Fredrickson, The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate on Afro-American Character and Destiny, 1817–1914 (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1971...
Book Chapter

By Kathleen Diffley
Published: 03 April 2002
DOI: 10.1215/9780822385967-033
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8596-7
... reply, 115–23. Thoughtfully diverging views appear in James M. McPherson, “Who Freed the Slave?”, in Drawn with the Sword, 192–207; George M. Fredrickson, The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate on Afro-American Character and Destiny, 1817–1914 (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1971...
Book Chapter

By Kathleen Diffley
Published: 03 April 2002
DOI: 10.1215/9780822385967-016
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8596-7
... reply, 115–23. Thoughtfully diverging views appear in James M. McPherson, “Who Freed the Slave?”, in Drawn with the Sword, 192–207; George M. Fredrickson, The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate on Afro-American Character and Destiny, 1817–1914 (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1971...
Book Chapter

By Kathleen Diffley
Published: 03 April 2002
DOI: 10.1215/9780822385967-007
EISBN: 978-0-8223-8596-7
... reply, 115–23. Thoughtfully diverging views appear in James M. McPherson, “Who Freed the Slave?”, in Drawn with the Sword, 192–207; George M. Fredrickson, The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate on Afro-American Character and Destiny, 1817–1914 (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1971...