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The preface argues that the rising attention in the humanities and social sciences to theories of biopolitics and posthumanism offers postcolonial studies an opportunity to develop an account of politics that tracks how international inequalities and forms of colonial power are expressed through the domain of life itself, through the body and its environments. This work, however, must be approached carefully and disentangled from a posthuman idealism that romanticizes the worlds of animals, environments, bodies, and things at the expense of accounting for the particular ways in which interspecies relations intersect with the structural forces of capital and the security state.

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