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The World Readers

The South Africa Reader: History, Culture, Politics

Edited by
Clifton Crais
Clifton Crais

Clifton Crais is Professor of History and Director of African Studies at Emory University. He is the author of Poverty, War and Violence in South Africa; Sara Baartman and the Hottentot Venus: A Ghost Story and a Biography (with Pamela Scully); and The Politics of Evil: Magic, Power and the Political Imagination in South Africa.

Thomas V. McClendon is Professor of History at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. He is the author of White Chief, Black Lords: Shepstone and the Colonial State in Natal, South Africa, 1845–1878 and Genders and Generations Apart: Labor Tenants and Customary Law in Segregation-Era South Africa, 1920s to 1940s.

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Thomas V. McClendon
Thomas V. McClendon

Clifton Crais is Professor of History and Director of African Studies at Emory University. He is the author of Poverty, War and Violence in South Africa; Sara Baartman and the Hottentot Venus: A Ghost Story and a Biography (with Pamela Scully); and The Politics of Evil: Magic, Power and the Political Imagination in South Africa.

Thomas V. McClendon is Professor of History at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. He is the author of White Chief, Black Lords: Shepstone and the Colonial State in Natal, South Africa, 1845–1878 and Genders and Generations Apart: Labor Tenants and Customary Law in Segregation-Era South Africa, 1920s to 1940s.

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Duke University Press
ISBN electronic:
978-0-8223-7745-0
Publication date:
2013

The South Africa Reader is an extraordinarily rich guide to the history, culture, and politics of South Africa. With more than eighty absorbing selections, the Reader provides many perspectives on the country's diverse peoples, its first two decades as a democracy, and the forces that have shaped its history and continue to pose challenges to its future, particularly violence, inequality, and racial discrimination. Among the selections are folktales passed down through the centuries, statements by seventeenth-century Dutch colonists, the songs of mine workers, a widow's testimony before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and a photo essay featuring the acclaimed work of Santu Mofokeng. Cartoons, songs, and fiction are juxtaposed with iconic documents, such as "The Freedom Charter" adopted in 1955 by the African National Congress and its allies and Nelson Mandela's "Statement from the Dock" in 1964. Cacophonous voices—those of slaves and indentured workers, African chiefs and kings, presidents and revolutionaries—invite readers into ongoing debates about South Africa's past and present and what exactly it means to be South African.

 

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