Skip to Main Content

This chapter focuses on the conceptual aftershocks stemming from book 3 of Plato’s Laws, where Clinias reveals to his interlocutors that he has been commissioned to settle a new colony. Reading Strauss and Badiou as mutually implicated in a tradition that posits the nonrelation between law and philosophy, the chapter shows how the impossible philosophical activity of inventing a new political order will silently shape the course of exploration in the Laws and in much of colonialist thought after Plato. Suddenly, philosophical nomos acquires a paradigmatic and, if the accusations Badiou levels at the lawgiving apparatuses of late Plato are correct, disastrous name in the emerging discourse of political philosophy, a name born from the immunitarian logic of colonial thinking: to solve the war within the home by constructing the space of a home away from home.

Don't already have an account? Register
Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal