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This chapter opens by addressing a blind spot in Hardt and Negri’s concept of the multitude and in Marx’s view of history and class struggle: the knot between war and production. Are revolutionary movements still part of what Foucault identified as the modern “ontology of war,” making them a result of antagonisms inherent in the development of productive forces in the biopolitical economy of capitalism, or can we detect in them the silhouettes of an alternative political theory that could end politics as war—and as production and self-production? In partial answer to that question, the essay arrives at a defense of Derrida’s democratic politics and his ethics of hospitality, with its insistence on the perilous conflicts and potentials that arise with the entrance of the visitor, the friend, or the stranger.

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