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Artists were challenged to reconfigure the terms of indigenous spatial struggles that reached a deadlock in the late twentieth century. Consequently, they took a novel approach to accelerating conditions of artistic mobility, setting out to remap the spatial, temporal, and material coordinates of a violently divided modernity. Jimmie Durham, James Luna, Edgar Heap of Birds, Robert Houle, and Kay WalkingStick plumbed archives and collections in Europe related to the historical travels of Native American people. Their works overturn a familiar narrative of colonization. Instead of an earth shaped by unilateral occupation, they envision former metropoles long filled with indigenous persons, objects, and meanings. Horton positions the work of the American Indian Movement generation at the intersection of indigenous sovereignty, crisis globalization, the so-called new materialisms, and an archival impulse in contemporary art. She makes the case that “modernisms” best accounts for the transcultural and transhistorical scope of the book.

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