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Passports draw lines of belonging and exclusion not only at international borders but also within nation-states. In chapter 7, Rachel E. Rosenbloom describes the rush of passport applications occasioned by the imposition of new documentation requirements for U.S. citizens entering the United States across land borders, and the U.S. State Department’s denial of passports to many Mexican Americans born in the borderlands of South Texas. The State Department has justified these denials by citing heightened fraud concerns regarding birth certificates signed by Latina lay midwives who practice near the U.S.-Mexico border. Rosenbloom argues that litigation over these passport applications is only the latest chapter in a much longer history of the domestic use of U.S. passports by those on the margins of U.S. citizenship, and of racialized presumptions of fraud within the adjudication of birthright citizenship claims.

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