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Miller begins with a comparison between what Ghosh means by the “ethics of Sahitya” (the Sanskrit word for literature) and what Miller means by “the ethics of literature.” Ghosh’s key word is hunger, an intrinsic quality of literary works that names “desire, motivation, intention, and dynamicity.” Miller means, in accordance with the meaning of the word ethics in the West, the presence in literary works, in their various dimensions (author, narrator, reader, characters), of the issue of conduct, of how to choose and act rightly. For Miller, each literary work has different presuppositions about the ethics of literature from all other works. He then turns to Anthony Trollope’s Framley Parsonage to investigate how ethical questions arise in that novel and to examine just what happens in his mind, feelings, and body when he reads the novel attentively. He discovers that the series of eleven love scenes between Lucy Robarts and Lord Lufton turns on the question of whether lying to the person you love is ever justified.

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